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Example of poor judgement and a lack of understanding about his role and place in society.
 

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Vermont State Police Trooper Lewis Hatch pulled over Gregory Zullo on March 6 because he had snow partially obscuring his license plate, which is not a violation in the wintery state. During the traffic stop, Zullo consented to a pat down and even took off his boots to allow Hatch to look inside, but refused to allowed the officer to search his vehicle, the Burlington Free Press reported.

I am no leo just a lac but Zullo consented to a partial search. A no no when dealing with leos. Either full search or NO search at all. I think the officer saw the back peddaling "incriminating"...imo
 

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I can't watch these. They make me cop rage.
 

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Vermont State Police Trooper Lewis Hatch pulled over Gregory Zullo on March 6 because he had snow partially obscuring his license plate, which is not a violation in the wintery state.
From where do you pull that idea? Driving with an obscured license plate is a violation in every state. It doesn't matter if it's a 'snowy' state or not.

A motor vehicle operated on any highway shall have displayed in a conspicuous place either one or two number plates as the commissioner of motor vehicles may require...The number plates shall be kept entirely unobscured, the numerals and the letters thereon shall be plainly legible at all times.
The Vermont Statutes Online

In fact, caselaw in Vermont clearly lays out that snow on a plate IS a valid reason to pull someone over. "It is undisputed that the officer in this case observed a motor vehicle violation... (a plate obscured by snow)"
https://www.vermontjudiciary.org/UPEO2001-2005/eo01064.aspx

I am no leo just a lac but Zullo consented to a partial search. A no no when dealing with leos. Either full search or NO search at all. I think the officer saw the back peddaling "incriminating"...imo
Again, no. Consent can be given for whole or part of a vehicle. Don't get me wrong, a police officer may suspect someone is hiding something based on limitations they provide, but that does not constitute reason to search beyond consent in and of itself.

Edit: I see that you got the idea that snow on a plate is not a violation from the article in question. The fact that they couldn't spend five minutes to google that they were wrong on that point should make everyone question what else they might be wrong about.
 
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