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Discussion Starter #1
It was quite an experience. Looking at the Devils Den and the Little round top made my stomach queasy.
The best I can describe that area is a knife fight in a tiny solitary cell while both opponents stand on stilts over a spiked pit.
There was ALLOT of NY regiments there, mostly from WNY and Rochester area.


Got to see some ignorant ******* stereotypes there too.
 

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do you know if the orange blossoms were there? thats the civil war regiment from here in orange county. i never cared much for the whole civil war thing,the idea of Americans killing Americans never appealed to me,but you can't deny history.
 

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Yes the 124th was at Gettysburg. They lost their Colonel there.
124th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"In the 2nd brigade, Birney's (1st) division, 3d corps, it marched on the field at Gettysburg with 290 officers and men, of whom 28 were killed, 57 wounded and 5 reported missing, both Col. Ellis and Maj. Cromwell being killed while bravely cheering on their men. A beautiful monument has been erected by the regiment at Gettysburg, surmounted by a life size marble statue of their heroic colonel."
124th NY Infantry Regiment during the Civil War - NY Military Museum and Veterans Research Center

their monument:
124th Infantry Regiment's Monument at Gettysburg - NY Military Museum and Veterans Research Center

I think this is a list of the NY regiments at Gettysburg, as you can see NY played a huge part there:
http://gburginfo.brinkster.net/AOP-regiments.htm#NY

also:
"the same anomaly regarding unequal state sacrifice applies to New York for the Union as it does to North Carolina for the Confederacy : although the battle was fought on its own soil, Pennsylvania troops accounted for 23,412 of the Union troops at Gettysburg, and for 5886 of the casualties, whereas 23,056 New Yorkers were engaged and suffered 6,694 casualties there." http://gburginfo.brinkster.net/Casualties.htm
 

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did you notice any "ghostly" stuff?

There was another thread on here where a member stated a lot of supernatural occourances happen there
 

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Discussion Starter #5
did you notice any "ghostly" stuff?

There was another thread on here where a member stated a lot of supernatural occourances happen there
Thankfully no, I did not stay at night. I may be one of those silly people but I like my dead people to stay dead.
 

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Discussion Starter #6

The above was a front loader 3 inch rifle.

But I got to see to confederate breechloaders provided by the English.
Bought a re-print of 19th century US army ordnance dept. ordnance manual.
LOTS of calculus in it.
 

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Civil War is not my thing for the same reason posted by OC shooter. I'm a French & Indian War buff, but I was riding through and I spent an afternoon there. I found Gettysburg to be so vast and sprawled out that it was hard to imagine. If you're interested in Civil War, go over to Antietam. it's a lot smaller,and spaces so much more compressed with whole regiments grouped into spaces where they were literally on top of one another. Go the "the cornfield" and you can really get a gut wrenching feeling of the horror of it all. Thousdands died in one afternoon into withering fire in a space the size of a large Walmarts. There were lots of NY outfits there also. I
 

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did you notice any "ghostly" stuff?

There was another thread on here where a member stated a lot of supernatural occourances happen there
I lived there for a year and used to go out on the battlefields at all times of night for the fun of it or just to take walks- I never ran across anything unusual. Great place to live, I really enjoyed it there.
 

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The only odd thing I ever saw there was neat the 76th NY's monument, there was one clover plant at the base of that monument that was all 4 leaf clover leaves- the whole plant. Every single one on the plant had 4 leaves. It was kind of cool but probably had more to do with whatever fertilizers they used there than anything else. Still kind of cool.

76th:
"On the 1st day of July the 76th Regiment had the dear bought honor to be the advance regiment of the 1st Corps, and nobly did they preserve the honor thus confered upon them. After coming in sight of the town of Gettysburg, our column filed to the left of the town and was forming in line of battle upon an eminence beyond the Seminary. Before our troops were placed in position, the enemy opened upon us a destructive fire with Artillery and Infantry. The 76th being the advance of the Corps, of course were on the extreme right, and subject to the cross fire from the enemy, who had succeeded in flanking us. Our gallant boys now returned their fire with interest as the enemy arose from their cover in a wheat field and charged upon us, supposing we were raw militia, they advanced their line steadily firing as they came. Our officers and men were falling upon every side and it was evident that they meant to surround us by their superior numbers, (the eleventh Corps had not yet arrived,) as we were now completely flanked. At this junction the gallant Major Grover fell mortally wounded, and died in a few moments after. The command now devolved upon Capt. John E. Cook, a brave and efficient officer who by his gallantry has won imperishable laurels. Too much cannot be said in praise of all, both officers and men, and many brave deeds were done which will never see the pages of history. At this time orders came from Gen. Cutler for us to fall back to the cover of a piece of woods. Our line was now re-formed and out of 340 men and 25 officers who entered the engagement only 100 men and 7 officers remained, showing how very destructive was the fire to which we were subjected, as we could not have been exposed more than twenty minutes. We again advanced and occupied our old ground with our skirmishers, but what a sight met our view.-Between our line of skirmishers and our line of battle lay our brave and heroic comrads, many gone to that land from whence no traveller returns, some in the agonies of death, and many of the wounded who were able to raise upon an elbow, cheering us on with: "give it to them boys, never mind us."
After holding our ground for sometime, we were marched in an oblique direction to the right, and took a position upon an eminence where the enemy were again trying their favorite flanking movement with a large force. There is no doubt but that the gallant and heroic 1st corps were now holding in check Lee's entire army. We were here engaged in a very heavy musketry fire, and exposed to a terrible shelling. After expending our sixty rounds of ammunition which told with terrible effect upon the enemy and completely silenced their Infantry fire, we were relieved by fresh troops. From this position we were forced beyond the city to the heights around Cemetry Hill, where the noble army of the Potomac upon the soil of Pennsylvania fully demonstrated to the world the kind of material of which it is composed.
Time and space will not permit me to give any details of the remaining three days fighting, which completely vanquished the invaders.
Yours Respectfully, C. A. WATKINS.
1st Lieut. and Acting Adj't." http://dmna.ny.gov/historic/reghist/civil/infantry/76thInf/76thInfCWN.htm
 

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A group of 20 of my friends and I took a guided motorcycly tour of the park. It was one of the best days I have spent down there.
 
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I remember seeing this monument at Gettysburg while I was commanding HHC, 1-108 NYARNG.

It was kind of spooky. Records show that the 108th had 200 troops engaged and suffered 102 casualties on July 2nd and 3rd , 1863.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Heavily forested hilly areas, you could lose whole regiments in there and not know it, no radio any kind of reliable communications.
 

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Heavily forested hilly areas, you could lose whole regiments in there and not know it, no radio any kind of reliable communications.
The 76th supposedly was the first infantry unit on the field that day and because it was on the extreme right it was in position waiting orders longer than the others regiments. Somewhere I read a letter from one of the soldiers who claimed they stood there in position and took three volleys while waiting. I can't even imagine that sort of discipline- Standing there scared out of your mind and watching the enemy level on you, fire, reload, aim, fire, reload as men fall all around you and you are rapidly being outflanked. I imagine the loss of Colonel Grover may have had something to do with all that but communications back then were often muddled.
 
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