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New York to Repeat Chicagos Parking Meter Catastrophe | | Rolling Stone

A New York parking meter deal, like the Chicago deal, would be a perfect example of the deeply cynical short-term thinking of many American politicians these days. These deals involve a sitting executive selling off a valuable piece of city property at a steep discount to private financial interests (often, to friends or campaign contributors), in order to solve a current cash flow problem that, surprise, surprise, will still be there the year after you finish spending the proceeds of your sale.
It seems America's politicians are selling off parts of the country little by little to Arab's, so the mega-rich get even richer and they aren't even citizens of this country.

If find this idea thoroughly disgusting the we have nothing but short sited, self centered politicians that have no issue with giving the country away. Now granted, it is NYC? maybe NYC should secede from the rest of the COUNTRY
 

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There is nothing that I can think of that the private sector can't do better and cheaper than the Govt. I don't have a problem with this other than the part of your statement obout it going out of the country.
 

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The bigger issue isn't the private sector doing things better or cheaper. Its 1) should we be selling off a revenue stream for the long term to solve a revenue shortfall in the short term, and 2) should private industry be in charge of enforcing laws (even just parking laws).

My answer is no to both.
 

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The bigger issue isn't the private sector doing things better or cheaper. Its 1) should we be selling off a revenue stream for the long term to solve a revenue shortfall in the short term, and 2) should private industry be in charge of enforcing laws (even just parking laws).

My answer is no to both.
exactly
 

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What the article does not address is the cost savings that are recognized by the leasing as well. Yes the revenue is gone on yearly basis but ,if structured correctly, you have an annual lease payment that is guaranteed. now take into account maintainance costs, partol vehicles for meter police and the meter maids themselves. show me that on a spread sheet and then you can say whether it makes sense or not. competatively bid to a structured RFP and then make a decission. The correct approach is sound. I am not saying Bloomberg isu sing a correct one, but you can't discount it without all the info.

I don't view writing tickets for parking as turning over law enforcement to private interests. It is not different that a private parking garage. The new swing in prisons is privatization. That also is a great idea if done properly. There is a reason you don't see the state and locals municipalities building infrastructure projects, risk and cost. The private sector can do it better and cheaper. how many jets are built by the Govt? same reason.
 

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I have said time & time again that almost everything should be privatized--there should be no goverment control/direct spending with any of the town/city Department of Public Works. All of that work (snow plowing, paving, road maintenance, lawn cutting, etc) should all be bid by the private sector. The money that would be saved on trucks, heavy equipment, labor, gas, insurance, etc would be mind boggling. If big businesses (I'm talking companies with massive factories/headquarters) have all done it and saved money, why can't the goverment? They could still keep a small crew around, but nothing like they currently have.

Before anyone says anything about jobs being lost--I DON'T CARE! I'm not paying taxes so that these town employees can brag about their guaranteed pensions, vacations & how they are overpaid to do nothing. These guys will be able to find jobs, probably with the new private companies--they might have to actually work though.
 

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the over riding question then becomes, "can it be done correctly"

Will a parking meter hourly rate go to $20 per hour? who is going to enforce payment? How will they enforce payment? who or where do you go for a dispute?

I see a lot of room for misconduct here.
 

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the over riding question then becomes, "can it be done correctly"

Will a parking meter hourly rate go to $20 per hour? who is going to enforce payment? How will they enforce payment? who or where do you go for a dispute?

I see a lot of room for misconduct here.
Privatization is not good when incorporates law into the matter. What happens if you do not pay your meter? It gets towed by the city but now since it is a private firm, they can tow it and charge you with whatever fees they want. Sounds like an open door to corruption. This country is in the ****ter and it will not change.
 

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Privatization is not good when incorporates law into the matter. What happens if you do not pay your meter? It gets towed by the city but now since it is a private firm, they can tow it and charge you with whatever fees they want. Sounds like an open door to corruption.
Looking to the government to avoid corruption is like going to the desert to avoid dehydration.

Will a parking meter hourly rate go to $20 per hour?
The basics of capitalism: supply and demand. If demand for parking is high enough to warrant $20/hr meters, then expect the prices to go there... as they should (regardless of who owns/runs the meters - gov't/private). I'm not interested in subsidizing someone's parking, are you? That's exactly what government price controls amount to.

Now let's consider the other side of capitalism: if someone bought all of the metered spots and started charging $20/hr for parking, almost overnight you would see new parking lots open up at $19/hr. The meter owner would drop his price to $18/hr, the parking lot owners would drop to $17/hr, so on and so forth, until supply (of which price is part of) and demand evened out.

who is going to enforce payment? How will they enforce payment? who or where do you go for a dispute?
Simple: the same way private parking lots enforce people who park there without permission.

I see a lot of room for misconduct here.
There's room for the same misconduct regardless of ownership.

Note that I'm not supporting a fire sale of government-owned parking meter spots, doing so is short-sighted and will only create a temporary solution to a permanent problem. A much more reasonable approach would be leasing operation rights, or a fee-sharing agreement.
 
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