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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Haven't used some hand planes in while and noticed some surface rust. Used a scotchbright pad and got most of it off but there is some deeper pitting that's not coming off. Is there anything I can use short of sanding the entire plane down? The base is clear of rust and its not that bad, but don't want it to get worse.

 

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You can mix baking soda and water to clean tools that get rusty. Use a toothbrush to scrub it into the pitting, rinse it out good. Put it under a halogen lamp when you're done for a while to make sure that all the water evaporates, and then a thin coating of WD-40 or Ballistol to keep it from coming back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You can mix baking soda and water to clean tools that get rusty. Use a toothbrush to scrub it into the pitting, rinse it out good. Put it under a halogen lamp when you're done for a while to make sure that all the water evaporates, and then a thin coating of WD-40 to keep it from coming back.
Thanks, yeah, I heard that before but forgot what to use, lol. WD-40 is no good on woodworking tools because it transfers to your project. I've used bees wax before and just read about using canola oil.
 

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WD-40 is no good on woodworking tools because it transfers to your project. I've used bees wax before and just read about using canola oil.
Never thought of that. I'm a car guy, so I don't have to worry about such things. LOL.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It seems elbow grease is the answer, lol...



Not perfect but I can live with this much "character"...
 

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You could put some car wax on them, wouldn't hurt the wood parts. Paste wax or Bee's wax works as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You could put some car wax on them, wouldn't hurt the wood parts. Paste wax or Bee's wax works as well.
It's not about hurting wood parts, waxes and oils can get into wood pores and can interfere with some finishes. But I've been using Johnson's paste wax on my table saw top for years without any problems.
 

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Will do, thanks!
do not use ironx on any bare metal surfaces. it will react with the steel or iron until one of the 2 are completely used up. ironx is meant for removing embedded rust, rail dust, and brake dust particles from automotive paint. it is an awesome product but it isn't something you would want to use on tools as it does not discriminate between rust (Fe03) or steel/iron. i know this from experience, not the internet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
BTW, I think the issue with car wax is some add silicone. I'm sure some products would be fine as well. I'm also sure a little WD-40 or whatever wouldn't be catastrophic, lol. Just passing along some things I've either read about or learned through the school of hard knocks over the years...
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
do not use ironx on any bare metal surfaces. it will react with the steel or iron until one of the 2 are completely used up. ironx is meant for removing embedded rust, rail dust, and brake dust particles from automotive paint. it is an awesome product but it isn't something you would want to use on tools as it does not discriminate between rust (Fe03) or steel/iron. i know this from experience, not the internet.
Makes sense. Thanks for the tip!
 

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do not use ironx on any bare metal surfaces. it will react with the steel or iron until one of the 2 are completely used up. ironx is meant for removing embedded rust, rail dust, and brake dust particles from automotive paint. it is an awesome product but it isn't something you would want to use on tools as it does not discriminate between rust (Fe03) or steel/iron. i know this from experience, not the internet.
Thanks for the info. I did not know that. I figured you could use it for a minute and then spray it off.
 

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there was a product called boeshield on the market a few years ago. it was developed by boeing aircraft to stop rust and not react with any metal. I've used it on the cast iron bed of my jointer planer table saw and drill press dose a hell of a job stopping rust. never used it on any of my 40 or so planes but it seems like it might work. by the way what make plane is that? lie nelson!
 

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2nd on the boeshield. You can spray it on, then wipe it off to leave a very thin film then let it dry. For heavy equipment stay on thick and leave.
I have tried them all, boeshield is superior.
 
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