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I am new to this. I am looking to buy a cheap reloading kit for my .40. Any ideas or links in what I need or what everything I need is going to cost. Thanks for your help in advance.
 

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he said cheap :) for a first press to learn on :

Pro 1000 Progressive Press Kit 40 S&W

I love mine, zero problems ever and I know Jeff has a number of them. you can go even cheaper if you want a turrent or single stage press from Lee.

Keep in mind you'll need a few things like a scale, calipers, etc. My first suggestion is getting your hands on a few books.

The ABCs of reloading doesn't have recipes but does a good job of giving you a solid reloading overview and going over the safety aspects.
Hornady, Lyman and Speer all have manuals with tons of recipes in them along with reloading basics.
 

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I have to chime in here with my experience. I got the Lee Pro 1000 as my first press (after seeing Tim's and liking it), and had nothing but problems. I sent it back after about a week of messing with it, and exchanged it for a Lee Classic Turret, and I've been extremely happy since.

The other thing to keep in mind is the Pro 1000 will only allow you to reload pistol calibers. If you think you might load rifle at some point, you'd be buying another press. That's fine, but if you'd rather have one press that can do both, go with a turret or a single stage. I can load about 150 rounds per hour if I push myself, I could up that to 200 if I got their priming system.

In general; I like Lee products. I got a lot out of watching some YouTube videos of different presses in action. To sum it up, a single stage does one thing at a time, so you de-prime ALL your cases, then you switch the die and do the next thing to ALL the cases. A turret is a hybrid between a single stage and a progressive, the "turret" rotates each time, bringing a new die into position, so you load one complete round at a time, then start over. A progressive does everything for you, so each time you pull/push the ram, the press is depriming a case, dispensing powder into a case, and seating a bullet into a case. All you have to do is set a bullet on the last case each time, and there is a bullet feeder available to fully automate it. The number of moving parts creates more points of failure, IN MY OPINION. I don't think Tim has had any problems with his.

For cheap to get started, I recommend Lee Classic Turret for the reasons above.
 

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Absolutely the best press around, I actually have TWO of them. Dillion also has a NO Bull S*** life time warranty.

One is dedicated to my 40cal race gun. I have literally 10,000+ rounds through it without any adjustment. I am running 160gr 'Extreme' FMJ bullets with Winchester Small Pistol Primers (or sometimes CCI) and 20 times fired brass (or more). I use International Clay Powder (ya, shot gun powder) I can use less powder and still make power for USPSC competition. When loading up a batch, I use Statistical Process Control (SPC) and a full visual inspection for quality control. I have not had a miss fire or a failure to feed issue in over 6000 rounds

The other press I use to run 30-30 rifle, 44 Mag, 44 special, and 380.

Get the Dillon, you can load almost every caliber under the sun (except shot gun and of course 50cal)

I forgot to mention, I have 550B's NOT the Square deal
 

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With a progressive reloader you do not learn how to reload you learn how to automate reloading. To learn reloading you learn in a single stage press.
Then you move to an automatic reloader. The biggest issue with some low end is the priming system. The Lee will work just fine to learn but it will require someone that is mechanically oriented and doesn't mind fiddling. The biggest thing is the priming system issues but some people with patience will make it work.
The dillon is a very good pistol reloader but it is an investment. The square deal above is an actual good deal all things considered.
Alternativelly, if you are on a budget you can find a used RCBS piggyback online that should work fine for learning but you need a single state press to run it. If you think you want to load rifle later on the hornady lock and load is great rifle press that with fine tuning can produce match grade reloads just like a single stage. I have one dedicated to this and another one I recently got and have setup for pistol calibers.

In any case things that you might want in a reloader are:
- First, reliable priming system. This is one of the reasons of many frustrations for progressive reloaders. Dillon, RCBS and hornady are good at this.
- Case feeding capability. The early RCBS piggy back didn't have it and it is ok, just need one more motion to grab the case and then the bullet.
- Accurate reliable powder measure CASE ACTIVATED. Otherwise a constant mess is almost guaranteed.
- 5 turret holes are not needed to start but if you want to have additional steps like a powder check die then you need this.

If you never reloaded I thing I would start with a single stage. There is always need to have a solid single stage at the bench. Again, progressive is not to learn reloading but how to automate that process.
If you are familiar with reloading then I hope the above helps you.
Always get quality dies that will pay off with consistent quality reloads and accuracy.
 

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4 Hole Turret Press Auto Index Deluxe Kit

Deluxe Carbide 4-Die Set 40 S&W 10mm Auto

I just started and this set up has worked great for me. I added a few nice things like a digital scale and a bullet puller. These two links will have you reloading the 40. I would add the case trimmer and guage. I am not into high production on the press and I like the reloading part too. I can put out about 150 357 magnums in an hour and not feel rushed.

Add a turret disc and a set of dies and you can have at another caliber. I am now doing 30-06, 270 Win, 308 Win and 357 Magnum on this press. The long action rifle cartriges i pull the rod and use it much like a single stage press but everything is there and set up on the turret. I can switch rifle calibers in about 2 minutes.
 

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I would agree with Meketrefe. if you are looking to learn to reload start with a single stage then move up. And once you move up to a progressive absolutely buy the best you can. The dillon is what many of us that shoot a lot use as they are reliable and like someone said once you have it set up it is repeatable as well.
 

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4 Hole Turret Press Auto Index Deluxe Kit

Deluxe Carbide 4-Die Set 40 S&W 10mm Auto

I just started and this set up has worked great for me. I added a few nice things like a digital scale and a bullet puller. These two links will have you reloading the 40. I would add the case trimmer and guage. I am not into high production on the press and I like the reloading part too. I can put out about 150 357 magnums in an hour and not feel rushed.

Add a turret disc and a set of dies and you can have at another caliber. I am now doing 30-06, 270 Win, 308 Win and 357 Magnum on this press. The long action rifle cartriges i pull the rod and use it much like a single stage press but everything is there and set up on the turret. I can switch rifle calibers in about 2 minutes.
Exactly what I bought a couple of months ago. I have the dies for .380, 9mm, .38/.357, and .45 acp. I really like that I can convert it to a single stage in about 3 seconds. Often times when I am looking to relax and kill a little time I will go out to the garage and just size a bunch of cases and have them ready for when I decide to get into a heavy reload mode.
Hey, just one man's $.02
 

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Exactly what I bought a couple of months ago. I have the dies for .380, 9mm, .38/.357, and .45 acp. I really like that I can convert it to a single stage in about 3 seconds. Often times when I am looking to relax and kill a little time I will go out to the garage and just size a bunch of cases and have them ready for when I decide to get into a heavy reload mode.
Hey, just one man's $.02
I have to admit, reloading IS relaxing, isn't it
 

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I will say I love sitting in front of my press and just hammering out usable ammo :)

In my experience as a first time reloader, going the progressive route I don't believe i missed out on learning anything that i would've with a single stage. however it's all about how you go into it. I went into it AFTER reading a few books and having others on hand, i went into it AFTER researching a TON online, i went into it after doing what Scotchman mentioned and watching as many videos as i could find.

i will also say that I've not ever had ANY of the problems that people claim the Lee 1000 has, neither has my brother in law. I also know Jeff here has more than one of the presses uses them quite a bit. however I was also there for Scotchman's issues, so i know they can exist too!

All of the manufacturers all have solid warranties and will generally take care of you if needed. I'd go lower end first to learn and then when you're definitely committed you can start spending piles of cash (it's easy to do, you definitely dont save money by reloading, you just shoot more!)
 

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I will say I love sitting in front of my press and just hammering out usable ammo :)

you definitely dont save money by reloading, you just shoot more!)
I do, I shoot at LEAST 80 rounds a week at the GCL on Wednesday night, Sometime it's only 60-70 rounds, sometimes more. But then I practice on weekends at Camp in the North country. there is another 40 to 60 rounds. So I could be up to 100 plus rounds per week.

BUT, my press is at least 12, maybe 14 years old. AND my cases (40cal, 44mag, 380 and 30-30) are free, so I don't have any expense there.

I calculated my 40cal cost me about 9¢ per round. for 40cal. (If I change to the Federal Primers the costs go up by a penny)

I have not done a cost analysis on the 30-30 yet as I just started to reload that caliber.
 

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The OP is looking for cheap and .40 S&W. I think the Dillon, while a superior press, doesn't fit his needs. He isn't looking to learn to load high end target loads. He probably is looking to load quantities of .40 for range use that will eventually lower his ammo costs after he recoups his equipment costs. I use 2 Lee Pro 1000 presses, one for 9mm and one for .45ACP. If you want cheap and quantity, they are hard to beat unless you are loading tens of thousands of rounds a year.
 

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what is the Lee 1000 cost and production speed? Is that a pistol only set up?
 

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i have a few friends that have the lee 1000 presses and they swear by them so i might have to look into it for the 45 acp that i will need to start reloading once my kimber 1911 gets here.
Give it a go :)

what is the Lee 1000 cost and production speed? Is that a pistol only set up?
About 150

Pro 1000 Progressive Press Kit 45 ACP

You can always find factory seconds at Lee's website : Closeouts - Lee Precision keep an eye there and you can get them at a decent discount.

As for pistol only - the 1000s can load pistol rounds and .223. that is it tho!
 

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one thing I thought of that is a *must have*

a Primer Flip tray, this little guy will save you a Pant load of time and aggravation.
 
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