New York Firearms Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
720 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
First off is it possible to remove it without screwing up the barrel? If it is possible is it legal to replace it with a front venting brake? Also, would this effect the ARs accuracy and fit?
Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,099 Posts
Yes

depends on how it was done

and if installed properly and is a good brake the new one should not affect accuracy. Though it could change the POI
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,238 Posts
First off is it possible to remove it without screwing up the barrel? If it is possible is it legal to replace it with a front venting brake? Also, would this effect the ARs accuracy and fit?
Thanks
You mean a linear brake or a krinkov type? Do you have any pictures.

The best thing is to see if you can drill out the pin w/o going too deep. Stop at the threads. If not you might have to cut it but then ou might
damage the threads. If so run the threading die again a few times. The best I thing will be a high speed cutting tool with a very thin but precise
cut that can provide lots of control. Whatever you do put brass screw or rod into the crown so you do not damage that or go anywhere near.

I would replace with something that allows you to do maintenance even after being pinned. So either a brake that allows the gas block to come off
or a 2 piece gas block. Always clamp on blocks one way or another.

I hope this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,238 Posts
How would it change the point of impact?
Anything that you touch in a barrel can potentially change the point of impact. Adding or removing or moving can change the harmonics of the barrel.
The question is, after something is done and the system zeroed does it remain on zero and consistent?
Some brake designs do a better job than others at doing that 'braking' and reduce felt recoil. So that is the most important thing but above all, the brake must not interfere with the accuracy potential of the system/barrel. Some do sometimes, even popular and expensive ones. Send some pics of what you have in mind.

Additionally one might consider if the brake is easy to maintain (keep clean) since accumulation of carbon can change the dynamics and performance of the break. Therefore in NY since they cannot be removed to be put in the ultrasonic cleaner or scrubbed the best thing is to stay away from enclosed, small port designs, including linear ones. Or must have them custom made with a "trap door" (bottom port) that is threaded so you can run a copper rod both sinceways and in every port. Wide open side ports are the easiest to clean and the most efficient too but they are also the loudest.

makes sense?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,188 Posts
A good gunsmith or a shop like ADCO should be able to get the old brake off for you. They grind down the old one where the pin is, and unscrew the brake (but of course it cannot be reused). Then you can have them install the new brake and pin it for you at the same time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
720 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Is there anyone or shop within a 50-75 radius of Rochester, NY that can do this type of careful work?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,238 Posts
I forgot there are some guys there by the finger lakes that were at the gun show that seemed ok and had good equipment in the shop.
Nothing high end is needed here, just a good mill, calipers and going slow/patience.

This is how much you need to mill out.... take the diameter of the brake at the highest point where is pinned... lets say 0.9 for example, subtract 0.5 (1/2 threads I assume) and you got 0.4". That is the diameter difference so now divide that by 2. that gives you 0.2" and that's how much difference you need to remove based on the radius. So set up the machine/bit to stop a tad before that and when you get close go small increments and testing every time with the wrench until it comes off.

After that you might want to consider a brake or block that allows easy maintenance during the service life of the rifle.

Here one example...

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,205 Posts
Call Mike at AllStar, check the vendor section.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
720 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Why not just soak the tip of the barrel in hoppes and blow it out with gun cleaner for hard to clean brakes?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,099 Posts
The carbon that builds up in them is very hard, it needs more than just soaking to remove.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,238 Posts
Why not just soak the tip of the barrel in hoppes and blow it out with gun cleaner for hard to clean brakes?
The only thing that cleans really well is an ultrasonic machine (sorry Mr. newyork brake) and a copper brush, metal pic right there where the carbon accumulation is building up. Some finishes are better than others but eventually will be like a solid rock and the smaller the ports the worse
it gets.
Hopes? Try it out if you want... then you will find out by experience.

Now, it is not a matter if the break will work or not but will not perform as it is supposed to, if the brake is even a good efficient design to start with.

One thing I hate is to work more than I should and specially cleaning well a gun. Again a ultrasonic cleaner is not an option here. So think, function is more important than coolness.
Think positive, at least we do not have to bolt down our magazines to the reciever like in Californistan. lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
720 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I wonder what would happen if you sprayed the brake with Pam before every shooting...might clean easier
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,238 Posts
I wonder what would happen if you sprayed the brake with Pam before every shooting...might clean easier
Probably not but might give you that nice smell of grandma's cooking. try also some garlic olive oil. lol.

Seriously, where fouling takes place any oils only make it worse. The only thing I can think off is have the brake treated with any of the easier to clean treatments like chrome or ni-Boron. I feel the best thing is to have something that by design is easier to clean and maintain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
720 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
yeah, looks like the levang linear might be hard to clean. I Just really wanted to get a brake that would direct the sound away from me...the crack is annoying.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,238 Posts
A krinkov style brake down to be cleaned. They are not great at reducing felt recoil but they are great at keeping the blast and noise forward.
Also the linear ones are not great neither at taking away any felt recoil so there you have an option. The other thing you can do is to have a linear
with a bottom threaded port in line with the crown that you can cover with a wide chovey set screw. If done right nobody will notice. But with anything above the gas block diameter I am always worry about maintenance.
I am also working on a brake design that allows both linear and side porting setup in one unit. This is a custom one like almost every brake I use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Think it work if I built a bracket to hold my AR vertical, muzzle down, then insert just the brake area into an open ultrasonic bath for cleaning?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,238 Posts
Think it work if I built a bracket to hold my AR vertical, muzzle down, then insert just the brake area into an open ultrasonic bath for cleaning?
I have not tried anything like this but I believe it will not work because the part will not be freely exposed to the vibration and frequency setup. the rifle will muffle all that. I am sure there is a method but at the same time there is no need to reinvent the black powder in the year 2012.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,099 Posts
Dillon makes a lube that USPSA open shooters often also use to coat their comps to help aid in less fowling and easier cleaning.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top