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Now, me, having owned pump shotguns for years, you would think I know the answer to this really easy question. I think I am overthinking this one though. So:

I take my Mossberg 590 out and look at it, load a few rounds, and rack the action, and a shell pops on to the elevator, about to go in to the tube right? Fine. Here is where I get confused. When the action is closed, the cartridge interrupter stops the shells from coming out of the mag tube. When you open it, the interrupter moves out of the way and pops a shell on the the elevator. My question is...what stops more then one shell from coming out? o_O I mean, I clearly see the interrupter move out of the way, pop the shell out, and after the shell is popped on the the elevator...the interrupter is STILL back, and stays that way until the action is closed. Why does only one shell pop out?

I know, silly, but I have always wondered that about pump action shotguns. :(
 

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Good question. On my Rem 870, there are two tabs that retains shells in the magazine tube. I believe they are staggered, so that when the rear tab releases a shell (on the backstroke), the front tab is not retracted, so it catches the next shell in the sequence. Or something like that. I haven't paid too much attention to the process...it's an 870, so as long as I don't load a shell backwards, it's always going to work.
 

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Does nobody actually know the forces of black magic that causes this to happen? xD
 

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I usually only have the time to figure out how stuff that doesn't work is supposed to work. Stuff that works doesn't need fixing. Since you mentioned it though, I'll look at my Ithaca 37 this weekend to try to figure it out. Of course my Ithaca isn't going to be the same as your Mossberg so that won't help you at all.
 

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It may be a start though. ;)
 

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Capture.JPG

After part 12 (cartridge stop) releases a round, part 11 (cartridge interceptor) is activated and catches on the rim of the next round in the magazine tube. This is a very simplified explanation but I know my Rem. 870 and Ithaca 37 have practically the same arrangement of two parts working in conjunction to release a round from the mag. tube and then immediately stop the following round from being released as well.
 

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Does nobody actually know the forces of black magic that causes this to happen? xD
What about Ithaca 37's and Browning BPS shotguns?! Ejecting a spent shell, and releasing a fresh shell from the magazine tube through the same port at practically the same time!! How did they figure that out!
 

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What about Ithaca 37's and Browning BPS shotguns?! Ejecting a spent shell, and releasing a fresh shell from the magazine tube through the same port at practically the same time!! How did they figure that out!
YEAH! My friend has an Ithaca that does that too!

My God. I think we have uncovered a great Pump-Shotgun Conspiracy...
 

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I'm sure a lot of trial and error was involved when the Ithaca shotgun was designed. (Actually a copy of the Remington model 17 designed by John Moses Browning and John Pedersen).
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Upon further inspection, CamoColton is right. There is another "Cartridge interrupter" on the other side. The shotgun would have gotten away with it too if it wasn't for those meddling kids. Great mystery solved. :)
 
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