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Discussion Starter #1
I finally picked up some RCBS dies and loaded up 50 .223 rounds tonight on a single stage press. Made sure everything was measured properly and grabbed my Stag model 3 to manually cycle ten rounds through the chamber to make sure they cycled smooth. One of the rounds chambered but would not eject and the charging handle would not slide back. I ended up taking the upper off and after about 3minutes of tugging I got the round out. Was this a fluke and the other round didnt seem to give me much trouble or was it due to the fact that I was manually cycling the rounds? I also had not wiped off the case lube from reloading yet but not sure if that would make a difference. The AR was just cleaned and lubed as well.

Also, some of the rounds had small dents in the primer after I manually cycled them but I thought I heard that that was normal for ARs?

Thanks for the help!
 

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Did you measure your case length before loading them? Did you full length resize?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
not sure...my plan as of now is to take the bullet seating die off tomorrow and reset it
 

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Discussion Starter #8
@varmit...I think you were right about the case crimping before the bullet was seated. I busted out the instructions and read them over again and believe that I didnt back the seating die out a full turn after it made contact with the shell when setting it up. Rookie mistake.

Going to have to head to the range and shoot the 50 i made today and hope that they cycle ok so I can reload them again.
 

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Also, some of the rounds had small dents in the primer after I manually cycled them but I thought I heard that that was normal for ARs?

Thanks for the help!
yes it is...it can also force the bullet deeper into the case and raise pressures if it is done repeatedly with the same cartridge
 

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The best thing in these cases is to take close up good quality pictures of the fired cases from all angles and also the ones not yet fired.

You might already know all this but this is a quick summary of things to verify:

- Brass segregated, properly cleaned, resized and trimmed to lenght.
- Verify powder charges before seating the bullets. Verify data with bullet manufacturer too. Solid copper bullets are longer for example.
- Make sure that any loads do not create a overgassing problem. Bolt trying to open before the bullet left the muzzle. Typical problem with carbine
length systems. For example an AR carbine that seems properly gassed with .223 PMC bronce might be too open for some 5.56 nato rounds.
- Seat bullets to measure below max COAL allowed for that chamber. 2.260 std. max COAL for .223.
- Proper crimp in the bullets to prevent bullet set back in auto-loaders. Careful not to crimp too hard. No much is needed to be effective.
- Make sure the feed ramps and poperly cut and clean of any cutting or rough edges that can damage the bullets or the case. Polishing the entire ramps is not needed but it doesn't hurt.
- Even bullets w/o canelure can use a light factory crimp, this also helps with consistent starting pressure one of the most critical aspects
of consistent loads.

Remember: Pressure signs come in twos or threes at the time. Some ejection marks in ARs is normal. Rounds that are stuck and do not eject is not normal and a clear indication that something is very wrong.

Do not discard troublesome brass because you will learn a lot from it. The answer might not be inside the case or primers but inside.
 
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