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Discussion Starter #1
Taken from Section 400 of the NYS Penal Law:

4-a. Processing of license applications. Applications for licenses
shall be accepted for processing by the licensing officer at the time of
presentment. Except upon written notice to the applicant specifically
stating the reasons for any delay, in each case the licensing officer
shall act upon any application for a license pursuant to this section
within six months of the date of presentment
of such an application to
the appropriate authority. Such delay may only be for good cause and
with respect to the applicant. In acting upon an application, the
licensing officer shall either deny the application for reasons
specifically and concisely stated in writing or grant the application
and issue the license applied for.

Just wondering: has anybody gotten their license in 6-months or less? Has anyone ever gotten a letter explaining why it's taking longer?
 

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I beleive the 6 months comes into play when the licensing officer(the judge) gets it. It could take 2 years to get to the judge and sit on his desk for 5.5 months then mail it to you.:)

The only local state I have heard time frame actually being disputed and winning is in NJ.
 

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Postmaster General
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The catch is that starts when it hit's the judges desk. We have had stories on here of it actually taking longer even after reaching the judge, but from what I remember it resulted in a slap on the wrist or something.
 

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yep,

the moment it hits the judges desk since they're the "licensing officer" which makes no sense to me, why involve anyone else? Send it right to the judge and have them sort out the rest of the details (background checks, mental health, etc).

usually most reports go along the lines of "i called the clerk and complained and asked about the 6 month window and then magically my permit appeared shortly thereafter".

So it seems even if its sitting on a judges desk, it can still be pushed to the front of the pile - even if you're calling the clerks office or the sheriffs.
 

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I wish I were an Oscar Meyer Weiner
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in each case the licensing officer shall act upon any application for a license pursuant to this section
within six months of the date of PRESENTMENT of such an application TO THE APPROPRIATE AUTHORITY. In truth the time starts when you turn it in. It specifically says in the law the licensing shall act within 6 months from the time its turned into the APPRORIATE authority. It does not say when turned into the licensing officer. The reason for it saying appropriate authority and not licensing officer is because each county has leway in determining who will accept the application.

That said the county will tell you this time starts when the judge gets it. I questioned the investigating officer about the time limit and when I specifically asked why it said the time started when turned into the appropriate authority and not the licensing officer he got defensive and wanted to know why I wanted my permit so bad lol. Needless to say I did not answer that because he didnt answer my question. So basically its very clear the time starts when you turn it in but unless someone fights them on it they will interpret it in any way that benefits them.

Also I did get my permit quicker by questioning him about the law because right before I asked he told me it would be a couple months before they would start my investigation and after asking about time limit they started it the next week.
 

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^ my thoughts too. I think "time starts when the judge gets it" is a BS excuse that permit offices tell people so it's someone's fault besides their own.
 

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I wish I were an Oscar Meyer Weiner
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6,795 Posts
I dont even blame the investigators or the permit office or even the judge. As long as everyone that works on it is backlogged with them and they told their supervisors then in the end it is the persons fault who didnt add the manpower needed to be in compliance. I can also tell you this. IF the county actually asked for an interpretation of the law instead of making their own then at the very least they should have a opinion from the AG office of NYS because that is part of their job to give opinions to local governments on laws.

That said if they continued to deny me my permit in a timely fashion (which they did so I give them credit) after I brought it up I was going to make a big stink lol. Best of luck to you.
 
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