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I recently purchased my first AR15, love it but the pull of length is a little extreme for me. I would like to take the pin out and adjust it to where it is comfortable for me and re-pin it. Is this possible and is it AWB legal?
 

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I would add to Dieter's list, cover the pin with epoxy. Is it necessary no, but if a cop wants to be a prick about seeing that you've moved pins, you can show him, they're not coming out.
yup. Pin then epoxy over it.

If you do a traditional pin job from the side....do NOT drill all the way through the tube assembly. It makes the pin too easily removed. Id reccommend to drill in a bit, pin it...BLACK epoxy over. Looks great when done (assuming a black stock).
 

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This only applies to post ban guns correct?
Yes correct. Mandatory for postban systems.
Since you are doing this take advantage of the situation and make sure it doesn't rattle.
You can also add an extra pin after your adjustment. The key, like suggested above is that you do a clean job and it is 'permanent' enough.
With permanent means one cannot change that configuration w/o using tools. So no matter how much more 'permanent' it is, it is always one
drill bit or radial saw away from impermanent. blind pin is perfect. a tad of epoxy like dieter suggested, I like that.
 

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Can I chime in here? First of all, I agree with everything said above, BUT, being how stocks are so cheap (I'm going with $50 to $300), I prefer to just epoxy the crap out of that thing so "permanent" is in fact permanent. Not saying you have to go this way, but it seems like a little cost for alot of peace of mind. Good luck.
 

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Can I chime in here? First of all, I agree with everything said above, BUT, being how stocks are so cheap (I'm going with $50 to $300), I prefer to just epoxy the crap out of that thing so "permanent" is in fact permanent. Not saying you have to go this way, but it seems like a little cost for alot of peace of mind. Good luck.
I've had epoxy and fall out of my guns in the past. Even massive globs didn't make a difference. Tried it on my old Sig 556. I didn't want to drill and pin my new gun. FILLED the stock assembly with epoxy. Just under normal stock manipulation the epoxy broke free easily and fell out. On TWO attempts. Pinning it is the way to go. Epoxy is just icing on the cake. Pun intended haha
 

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I've had epoxy and fall out of my guns in the past. Even massive globs didn't make a difference. Tried it on my old Sig 556. I didn't want to drill and pin my new gun. FILLED the stock assembly with epoxy. Just under normal stock manipulation the epoxy broke free easily and fell out. On TWO attempts. Pinning it is the way to go. Epoxy is just icing on the cake. Pun intended haha
I've got three pins, all the way through both sides, plus the whole buffer tube was painted with 2500# 2HR epoxy. If it breaks loose, it's not because I didn't try to make it permanent (no quotes). Got to do what makes you sleep at night. I know one thing for sure, it beats one blind pin with no epoxy.
 

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Look, if any goon is going to go after someone with a blind pinned stock it is up to them to demonstrate that is not permanent.
In fact many of those sold at big retail stores are just pinned, including the muzzle brake. Take a look around about some the
Gander are selling like that all over. People had inquiries in those retailers and they said it is ok. They are not recalling anything.
So if is is good for them, it is good for me. 100% pizzof mind.
 

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Presuming standard carbine stock, a castle nut wrench to remove the receiver extension and a hammer and punch to stake the receiver plate upon reassembly. (spring loaded punch also acceptable)
Remove buffr and spring and be prepared to catch buffer retainer and spring once you begin to unscrew the extension from the receiver then the takedown pin detent spring possibly along with detent.

Use extreme caution unscrewing/screwing in the RE as the receiver plate will be turning too and it can easily guillotine or at least bend the **** out of the takedown pin detent spring.
Back the castle nut ALL the way off so the plate can be pulled back and detent spring removed/installed cleanly. Just getting things loose and trying to unscrew the RE from there will only result in damage to the takedown pin detent spring.

To get factory pin(s) out, and going by them most commonly being
1/8" x 1/2" spring type, get a drill that is smaller than OD but a smidge bigger than ID and get after it at medium to low drill speed.
At a certain point the bit will want to bind a little in the pin and begin to turn it in the hole its been put into, with drill still turning you can usually pull the pin straight out by that stage.

Drill press w/vice would be best, but it can be accomplished w/a hand drill and holding it on the floor with a knee.
Not saying its a great plan, just tht can indeed be done.
 

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@Tifosi, where/how doi you stake the castle nut to the receiver plate? Just once where they meet? Do you go into the castle nut, receiver plate at 90 degrees or into the joint at 45 degrees? Is this necessary if I'm using loctite (blue)? Thanks, great info above.
 

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A proper castle nut has three small notches on the receiver side.
Ideally you engage two of them by staking the receiver plate next to them.

Standard center punch held at 90° to the receiver plate and just a bit off center toward the castle nut.
The displaced material from the punch will squeeze into the small notch in the castle nut locking it in place.

Using that method is proper, no loctite is needed, and will stay there until you break it loose with a castle nut wrench.

If you've not got the three small notches its a lower quality nut and should be exchanged for a proper one as there's no guarentee its even the proper size if they couldn't even be bothered with putting the notches in.

If you absolutely have to use that kind, loctite is the only solution.

Good stake job pic attached
(square punch mark is propritary to Colt, don't worry about it round is fine)
 
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