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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
All,

I know there are a lot of sight options out there (e.g. three dot, "dot the I", etc), but it seems like there's a growing consensus that one should have a plain black rear sight and a brighter front sight post (i.e. fiber optic, tritium, what-have-you).

Here is what I hope are some helpful comparison photos. I lined up two Glock slides side-by-side. The one on the left has the stock Glock sights, the one on the right has a simple Hi-Viz fiber optic front sight with a factory rear sight that I blacked out with a Sharpie.

When the rear sight comes into focus, the factory sight is clearly "busy". There's a lot going on, and the eye is naturally drawn towards the big white U-shape:


When the front sight comes into focus, the bright green really stands out without any distraction.


Of course, there are limitations. Fiber optics ≠ night sights, so one of these days I'm going to get proper Ameriglo Hackathorns (photo taken from Amazon's product page):

https://www.amazon.com/AmeriGlo-GL-433-Hackathorn-Sight-Glock/dp/B005BSOHMI

But for under $25, I feel like I vastly improved my sight picture.

V/R,
butler
 

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I agree, but why not have a tritium rear sight for darkness.
If your shooting at some distance you cannot rely solely on your front sight.
You must have some type of sight alignment.
Ameriglo Operator Set.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I agree, but why not have a tritium rear sight for darkness.
If your shooting at some distance you cannot rely solely on your front sight.
You must have some type of sight alignment.
View attachment 64156
1) I still think three dots make for a more "busy" sight picture.
2) I can't imagine pulling the trigger without being absolutely sure of my target (and what lies beyond), so if I'm lighting up the room/hallway with a weaponlight, I think the need for night sights is reduced
3) I also think it's unlikely that I would shoot at significant distance at night in a self-defense scenario

For all these reasons, I believe the benefit of a simpler sight picture outweighs the disadvantage of a plain black rear sight.

However, if I had to get tritium in the rear sight to establish some sort of fool-proof reference point, I would get these Ameriglos:


Again, less for your brain to visually process.
 

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I agree again.
But after you illuminate your target you still have to align your sights to get a good hit.
If your close enough you can point shoot.
Just don't mention that in the investigation.
I like to see something besides a cutout in the rear sight.
I prefer your second choice.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I agree again. But after you illuminate your target you still have to align your sights to get a good hit. If your close enough you can point shoot.
Yeah, what's that adage about most self-defense encounters occuring within 6-10 feet?
Realistic Self-Defense Shooting Ranges - AllOutdoor.comAllOutdoor.com

Just don't mention that in the investigation.
Ha! Nice.

I like to see something besides a cutout in the rear sight. I prefer your second choice.
Good deal.
 
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