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This part is interesting.

What are NY's Laws on use of Deadly Force?
Note: This is a very gray area of the law - always use caution and only resort to deadly force if your life is in immediate jeopardy.​

N.Y. Penal Law 35.15.1:

§ 35.15 Justification; use of physical force in defense of a person.
1. A person may, subject to the provisions of subdivision two, use
physical force upon another person when and to the extent he or she
reasonably believes such to be necessary to defend himself, herself or a
third person from what he or she reasonably believes to be the use or
imminent use of unlawful physical force by such other person, unless:
(a) The latter's conduct was provoked by the actor with intent to
cause physical injury to another person; or
(b) The actor was the initial aggressor; except that in such case the
use of physical force is nevertheless justifiable if the actor has
withdrawn from the encounter and effectively communicated such
withdrawal to such other person but the latter persists in continuing
the incident by the use or threatened imminent use of unlawful physical
force; or
(c) The physical force involved is the product of a combat by
agreement not specifically authorized by law.
2. A person may not use deadly physical force upon another person
under circumstances specified in subdivision one unless:
(a) The actor reasonably believes that such other person is using or
about to use deadly physical force. Even in such case, however, the
actor may not use deadly physical force if he or she knows that with
complete personal safety, to oneself and others he or she may avoid the
necessity of so doing by retreating; except that the actor is under no
duty to retreat if he or she is:
(i) in his or her dwelling and not the initial aggressor; or
(ii) a police officer or peace officer or a person assisting a police
officer or a peace officer at the latter's direction, acting pursuant to
section 35.30; or
(b) He or she reasonably believes that such other person is committing
or attempting to commit a kidnapping, forcible rape, forcible criminal
sexual act or robbery; or
(c) He or she reasonably believes that such other person is committing
or attempting to commit a burglary, and the circumstances are such that
the use of deadly physical force is authorized by subdivision three of
section 35.20.


N.Y. Penal Law 35.20:


§ 35.20 Justification; use of physical force in defense of premises and in defense of a person in the course of burglary.
1. Any person may use physical force upon another person when he or
she reasonably believes such to be necessary to prevent or terminate
what he or she reasonably believes to be the commission or attempted
commission by such other person of a crime involving damage to premises.
Such person may use any degree of physical force, other than deadly
physical force, which he or she reasonably believes to be necessary for
such purpose, and may use deadly physical force if he or she reasonably
believes such to be necessary to prevent or terminate the commission or
attempted commission of arson.
2. A person in possession or control of any premises, or a person
licensed or privileged to be thereon or therein, may use physical force
upon another person when he or she reasonably believes such to be
necessary to prevent or terminate what he or she reasonably believes to
be the commission or attempted commission by such other person of a
criminal trespass upon such premises. Such person may use any degree of
physical force, other than deadly physical force, which he or she
reasonably believes to be necessary for such purpose, and may use deadly
physical force in order to prevent or terminate the commission or
attempted commission of arson, as prescribed in subdivision one, or in
the course of a burglary or attempted burglary, as prescribed in
subdivision three.
3. A person in possession or control of, or licensed or privileged to
be in, a dwelling or an occupied building, who reasonably believes that
another person is committing or attempting to commit a burglary of such
dwelling or building, may use deadly physical force upon such other
person when he or she reasonably believes such to be necessary to
prevent or terminate the commission or attempted commission of such
burglary.
4. As used in this section, the following terms have the following
meanings:
(a) The terms "premises," "building" and "dwelling" have the meanings
prescribed in section 140.00;
(b) Persons "licensed or privileged" to be in buildings or upon other
premises include, but are not limited to:
(i) police officers or peace officers acting in the performance of
their duties; and
(ii) security personnel or employees of nuclear powered electric
generating facilities located within the state who are employed as part
of any security plan approved by the federal operating license agencies
acting in the performance of their duties at such generating facilities.
For purposes of this subparagraph, the term "nuclear powered electric
generating facility" shall mean a facility that generates electricity
using nuclear power for sale, directly or indirectly, to the public,
including the land upon which the facility is located and the safety and
security zones as defined under federal regulations.


Note that if defending yourself from an attack or burglary, if you retreated to your home safely - stay there and call the police. Do not escalate the situation by leaving your home and going after the aggressor. Such was the case of The People vs. Hernandez, who was found guilty of manslaughter since he shot him in the "common area" after he had safely retreated to his home (within his 4 walls), after being attacked, where he went back to confront the aggressor with a gun and shot him. The link below also provides direct links to the NY Penal laws on use of deadly force and cites other recent cases, so it's a good reference.

People Vs. Jose Hernandez:
1 No. 61: The People &c. v. Jose Hernandez

Duty to Retreat:
NY State requires duty to retreat whenever possible,
EXCEPT
in one's own dwelling. (35.15.2(a) - listed above) -
This does not give you to right to shoot anyone in your home! It is only of a last resort if you are under immediate danger/duress

Note that there was a case People vs. Aiken, where a man tried to enter a person's home. The owner shot him in the apt. doorway that separated his apartment and the hallway. Because the actual doorway was considered not his dwelling, being outside the walls of his apt. He was convicted of manslaughter.

http://www.stjohns.edu/academics/gra...-1/delpozo.stj

In People v. Aiken, the New York Court of Appeals held unanimously that a person standing in his apartment doorway has a duty to retreat inside before using deadly force in self-defense. History supports the notion that the dwelling exception to the retreat rule is meant to prevent people from having to flee their homes in times of danger. Hence, both precedent and common sense dictate that "requiring a person standing in the doorway to step inside the apartment to avoid a violent encounter is not the equivalent of mandating retreat from one's home."

The dwelling exemption across all retreat jurisdictions should extend only to inhabited physical structures and completely enclosed appurtenances, such as porches and terraces. This workable rule allows fact finders to focus less on whether something is or is not a dwelling on a case-by-case basis, and more on the "central question [of] whether defendant reasonably believed she was about to suffer death or serious physical injury." The prerequisite that defensive force, to be justified, appear necessary makes retreat a lesser included of this principle. Thus, an exemption from retreat for a homeowner who barely discerns danger to his person or property, and yet chooses to escalate hostilities, may be a free pass for murder.


Court summary of this case is available here:
1 No. 31: The People &c. v. Richard Aiken

So as you can see, use of deadly force can still result in conviction, so only use it as an absolute last resort. (kick, push, ram the person out of your dwelling if you have to - only use deadly force if you have no choice...). The statute says it's justifiable in one's dwelling to prevent a burglary, but remember - you have a good chance of it going to court where that burden of proof will be on you if you shot someone.

Again, I stress that this is not legal advice, nor is this information to be construed as condoning/supporting/promoting use of deadly force. This is presenting some of the facts as they are. It is ultimately up to you to make your own conclusions, research, and make your own decisions on your own legal council or policy.

Does NY Have Castle Doctrine?
No. However, note the above laws on use of deadly force in a dwelling - however it's restricted to your dwelling (ie: within your walls and not in any common space such as the doorway) and a burglary is in progress. There have been many cases of deadly force being used in those cases of home invasions, however, almost all went to a grand jury for a review. Again, express extreme restraint in using deadly force and only resort to it only in the absolute need where there is literally no other option.

NY Self-Defense Blog:
http://www.claytoncramer.com/gundefe...labels/NY.html
 
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