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Discussion Starter #1
At 09:45 EDT on a clear summer morning, a stolen twin engine Piper Aztec piloted by an Islamic jihadist bent upon martyrdom approaches downtown Rochester at an altitude of 2,500-feet above ground level (AGL). Behind the pilot is a single 200 kiloton plutonium fission device borrowed from a nuclear weapons storage facility in Hasanabdal, Pakistan.

Upon reaching a point directly above the Blue Cross/Blue Shield arena, formerly known as the War Memorial, the pilot presses two switches simultaneously causing the device to detonate.

At the Strathallan, 550 East Avenue, one mile slant range from the detonation, the 1,800-foot diameter fireball lays down 200-calories of heat energy per square centimeter. Only 10-calories per square centimeter are required to cause second degree burns. It takes the fireball only 4-seconds to emit 80% of its heat energy. At the peak of the thermal pulse, approximately 3-seconds after detonation, the blast wave reached the Strathallan applying an overpressure of 21-pounds per square inch and a wind velocity of 500-miles per hour. At an overpressure of 5-pounds per square inch a wood frame structure (typical house) suffers heavy damage. These forces completely destroy every structure within the 1-mile radius.

At the intersection of Lexington and Lake Avenues, two miles from the detonation, the shock wave arrives in 7.5-seconds carrying with it a peak overpressure of 7-pounds per square inch and a wind velocity of 220-miles per hour. This far from the detonation broken window glass is propelled at 325-feet per second. A person standing in the open is hurled at a velocity of 34-feet per second. At a two-mile distance thermal energy is laid down at 40-calories per square centimeter, four times the amount to cause second degree burns.

At the Rochester International Airport, three-miles from the detonation the blast wave arrives 12-seconds after detonation with a maximum overpressure of 3.9-pounds per square inch and a wind velocity of 120-miles per hour, enough to break windows but leave frame buildings otherwise undamaged. Thermal energy absorbed at this distance is 20-calories per square centimeter, still more than enough to cause second degree burns of exposed skin.

At the Country Club of Rochester, four-miles from the detonation the blast wave arrives 16-seconds after detonation with an overpressure of 2.5-pounds per square inch and a wind velocity of 75-miles per hour. Some windows will be broken but otherwise there is little structural damage. Thermal energy is delivered at about 10-calories per square centimeter.

At the West side of the Irondequoit Bay Bridge, five-miles from the detonation, the blast wave arrives 20-seconds after the detonation with negligible effect and a wind velocity of 60-miles per hour. Thermal energy is deposited at about 5-calories per square centimeter.

At my desk, twenty-four-miles from the detonation I notice stark shadows in the parking lot that last for a little less than a minute followed by what sounds like a peel of thunder accompanied by a warm 4-mile per hour breeze.
 

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Thread cleaned up. If you aren't contributing to the topic then don't post.
 

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Now inmage that it isn't just a single bomb, but mutiple bombs throughout the US....I have heard tell that we are at a greater risk of nuclear destruction now than at any time during the cold war..
 

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Glad I live in utica lol, what kind of fallout would there be in this situation?
 

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My absolute biggest fear of the worst terrorist attack would be a two or three nuclear bomb coordinated detonation in American cities. That would probably cause so much fear and panic that general collapse could occur. And there are so many nuclear weapons out there that are nowhere near as secure as they should be. What would we do then?

And kmussack great descriptive narration!
 

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There's only one thing you can do during a nuclear explosion - put your head between your legs, and kiss your a$$ good-bye...
 

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I hope it doesn't come to that Chris, plus we have our hands full fighting the craziness of our own people right now!
 
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Discussion Starter #11
Glad I live in utica lol, what kind of fallout would there be in this situation?
The optimum blast effects on target come from a detonation at altitude.
This keeps fallout to a minimum.
Surface bursts are dirty and produce lots of fallout.
 

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Rochester is an unlikely target. A big city, congested would be hit. The only way Roc ever gets hit by nuclear anything is if the nearby power plant goes up (very unlikely) or there is a nuclear war with a real power (very unlikely).

Terrorists have tried forever and thus far had ZERO success ever detonating a nuclear weapon, even a dirty bomb. No dirty bomb has ever been used in any terrorist attack. The materials are just too damn hard to get a hold of.

I believe, similar to above, that IF a couple of cities were hit the nation would go "full retard". 911 was bad enough and it only killed 1/100,000 Americans.
 

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Actually no, people have been very close to atomic detonations and survived. At Hiroshima about 100 people were in a 1/4 mile long tunnel 1/10 of a mile from ground zero. The soldiers smoking and joking at each end of the tunnel were killed but it's said 90 people walked away. At Nagasaki several hundred Allied POW's, who had seen the bright light and smoke from Hiroshima, were allowed to take shelter in a drainage ditch about 800 yards from groud zero. The four who stood up to watch the bombing died. The rest walked away and some lived long enough to be interviewed for the book"First into Nagasaki" Good reading also is Creson Kearney "Nuclear War Survival Skills" and "The Efects of Nuclear Weapons" Gladstone and Dolan 1977. If you can avoid exposure to the fireball for 2 minutes your chance of survival is very much in your favor. If the shock wave has'nt hit you in 25 seconds you are far enough away to go about your bussiness. The initial detonation, The electromagnetic/Thermal pulse comes in two waves, a small pulse with about 10% of the thermal and nuclear energy followed 1/3 of a second later by 90% of the thermal and nuclear energy. People who were briefed by Japans nuclear team leader after Hiroshima and before nagasaki took the first pulse of very bright light as a warning and hid in the shadows from the second pulse of very bright light lived.
 
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Discussion Starter #15
Sadly the American public, to include some of the posters here, are sadly misinformed. (Intentional Misinformation operation by Soviet KGB was disclosed after the fall of the Soviet Union.)
 

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There's no way Rochester is getting hit by terrorist. lol terrorist cant spell Rochester or even point it on map
if there's an attac on NY , you can eat our ass its NYC or Indiana point
 

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Kevin, ever think about writing a book? I would seriously buy that book. Get on it.

As for the blast, just keep a gallon jug of iodine for chugging and you'll be good to go.
 
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Discussion Starter #18
There's no way Rochester is getting hit by terrorist. lol terrorist cant spell Rochester or even point it on map
if there's an attac on NY , you can eat our ass its NYC or Indiana point
Rochester is unlikely to be targeted.
I used Rochester as an example because many on this forum are familiar with it's geography.
 
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