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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got a little bored and thought about cleaning, repairing, and repainting some on my AR-15 prebans. After just painting one of my mags, I ran out of paint. So i figured I would try something a little different. I've been doing custom paint jobs for cars for a while, so why not on a mag. Now I've never heard of anyone doing this, so why not try it out... "Powder Coating Magazines" I've done them for all sorts of parts, and they have always seemed to stand up to wear & tear. So hear we go...

Started out with these. Some needed dents repaired, fixed a few cracks, and a little spring cleaning.
Bumper Automotive exterior Gas Auto part Automotive lighting

After fixing, I ended up just scrubbing with an S.O.S. pad.
Rectangle Gas Wood Composite material Metal

Applied the powder, put in kiln, baked around 400 degrees F for about 15 minutes. After the cooled, i replaced the followers
This is the test batch. they turned out with a very nice finish.
Brown Bag Luggage and bags Material property Wood

As for how well they hold up at the range or in combat? The closest thing I could come up with is, letting my Great Dane play fetch with one. I few minor dings (almost unseen) and that was it. Now only 180 more to refinish. Going to be a long night.
 

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Any issue with the known thickness increase inherant w/powdercoat?

If you've got a mag toward the upper side of spec width and a magwell toward the bottom side, (or even just a thickly finished lower), even just a few thousandths of overcoating will cause problems like tough insertion and no drop free.

That's the primary reason most restorers don't/won't powdercoat actually.
Well, that and its a SOB to get off there if you do end up a victim of the above issues and need to strip it off.

Not a super big deal in most states if it does end up too thick as they can just be tossed in the trash and replaced with new, but folks in the limited~to~preban~normal~capacity~mags can find that little adventure more than just a bit cost prohibitive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Any issue with the known thickness increase inherant w/powdercoat?

If you've got a mag toward the upper side of spec width and a magwell toward the bottom side, (or even just a thickly finished lower), even just a few thousandths of overcoating will cause problems like tough insertion and no drop free.

That's the primary reason most restorers don't/won't powdercoat actually.
Well, that and its a SOB to get off there if you do end up a victim of the above issues and need to strip it off.

Not a super big deal in most states if it does end up too thick as they can just be tossed in the trash and replaced with new, but folks in the limited~to~preban~normal~capacity~mags can find that little adventure more than just a bit cost prohibitive.
Only had an issue with one mag, that one was giving me problems before I powder coated. (no drop) turns out the top of the mag was slightly dented, easy fix. My first thought was it was the powder coat but turn out to be something easier. Removing that stuff is no problem if you have the right tools. I just heat it up a bit then blast it with some walnut shells. Nice to have my mags looking good again
 

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Well look a you, mister all the right tools LOL
They do look very nice though


How are you dealing with dents?

Slap hammer, some kind of dolly, levers, pulling with a glue stick or what?
 

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LMAO about the combat testing...

They look good.

Aside from thickness at top mentioned above, I'd be sure there are no issues internally. Maybe you should keep a couple dozen of your collection in OEM condition for the when SHTF;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well look a you, mister all the right tools LOL
They do look very nice though

How are you dealing with dents?

Slap hammer, some kind of dolly, levers, pulling with a glue stick or what?
Took some rods and flatten the ends so i could fit them inside, heat the mag up a bit, then slowly work the dent out with beating it too much. Easier to do body work on a car but I don't want to see these prebans go to waste. Without the heat I cracked a mag and had to weld it, learning as i go.
I know this is off the subject but would it be legal for me to take two prebans and make one large mag? Not for the AR , but wanted to make a hi-cap mag for my PSL.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
LMAO about the combat testing...

They look good.

Aside from thickness at top mentioned above, I'd be sure there are no issues internally. Maybe you should keep a couple dozen of your collection in OEM condition for the when SHTF;)
Before spraying them, closed up the inside to prevent anything from getting inside. Prepping for paint is key. I have a different collection of mags set aside that I left original, ones I had overseas, some my father had in Vietnam.
 

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Nice looking mags...! I just did some,but I used a product called Perma-Slik,it is a self lubricating epoxy based coating......It is expensive,I paid $23.00 shipped for one 12oz can,but it is tough as nails and gives the mags about as close to a factory new gray finish as i have ever seen.....Nice weekend project.....:)
 
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