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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a new owner so go easy on me. First purchase was a classic Ruger Security Six 4" in .357. I am researching my second purchase (for home defense) and after considering all the reviews I have a dilemma. First let me say I don't want a micro 9, or a small gun for CC. It's going to be for target and defense. I am a big dude and have large hands, so A full size is good for me. That said after tons of research I narrowed down to the Walther PDP, The Canik SFX9 and The Sig P226. All factors considered I believe the Canik is the best choice. Now the dilemma......I have always heard that 1911 style guns are not for newbies, and that they are less safe to handle. I am very interested in the Springfield Ronin in 9mm or 10mm. (My guess is that in lean ammo times 9mm is easier to get, so I'll probably go 9). After watching many videos is seems most polymers only have a split trigger and no safety (Glock) or 1 manual safety. The Ronin has a grip safety, thumb safety and if you don't rack the slide an extra safety on both if you count it that way. So why isn't the 1911 platform more safe? Any and all input appreciated.
 

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I may be a little biased towards Sigs, but are you aware that if you buy a 40 or 357 P226 or P229 you’ll be able to shoot 9, 40, and 357 with the same slide and a barrel swap? To shoot all 3 calibers, you can start with a 9mm but the other 2 will be aftermarket barrels. It’s easier to start with a 40 or 357.
You can even get a conversation kit if you can find one and shoot 22LR as well. It is a barrel, slide, and a mag.
I was always content with just a 9mm, until I shot a 40 and realized the potential of a single multi caliber weapon. Now I shoot all 4. 357 is probably my favorite self defense round and 22 for plinking at the range.
 

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I love the 1911 platform. I see no reason you shouldn't go for the Ronin. In fact, I think you should buy all of the guns you mentioned.

Go for whatever combination of safety devices you are comfortable with. There's no right or wrong choice. The most important safety device is the operator - hone that safety to perfection and nothing else matters.

I get the arguments for and against the various safety devices. It's inarguable that the more devices you have, the more things that can go wrong. It's also inarguable that as you increase the safety devices on a firearm, the chances of a negligent discharge being prevented are slightly higher (just by the simple fact that there are more things that can prevent the gun from firing).

I think it comes down to personal utility and situation. For myself, I like having a manual safety on a carry gun, but I'd prefer to not have a grip safety. Similarly, I wouldn't want a single action-only gun for a carry gun, I wouldn't want to need to cock the gun each round in a hairy situation.

But, put me in a different situation - say, if I were a cop, or if I were in the military on the battlefield - I would not want a manual safety on a pistol.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I love the 1911 platform. I see no reason you shouldn't go for the Ronin. In fact, I think you should buy all of the guns you mentioned.

Go for whatever combination of safety devices you are comfortable with. There's no right or wrong choice. The most important safety device is the operator - hone that safety to perfection and nothing else matters.

I get the arguments for and against the various safety devices. It's inarguable that the more devices you have, the more things that can go wrong. It's also inarguable that as you increase the safety devices on a firearm, the chances of a negligent discharge being prevented are slightly higher (just by the simple fact that there are more things that can prevent the gun from firing).

I think it comes down to personal utility and situation. For myself, I like having a manual safety on a carry gun, but I'd prefer to not have a grip safety. Similarly, I wouldn't want a single action-only gun for a carry gun, I wouldn't want to need to cock the gun each round in a hairy situation.

But, put me in a different situation - say, if I were a cop, or if I were in the military on the battlefield - I would not want a manual safety on a pistol.
I would love to own them all, but the fact that you have to make 2 trips to 1PP for every purchase adds about $800 to every purchase and my employer wouldn't be happy with all the time off.
 

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I’m not a revolver guy, but I’d have to say you made a good first purchase.
The other thing to consider in self/defense guns would be DA/SA. The first pull on the trigger is heavier and more deliberate, and subsequent pulls often much lighter. I’m in favor of decockers to lower the hammer, and return the gun to ‘double action’. Opponents of this say difference in the quality of the trigger pull between the first two shots is a problem. For me, this is as much a matter of training as using a 1911, and having to manage the trigger when you draw and transition.
My ‘in the safe under the bed gun’ is a CZ 75 SP-01 with a decocker and a light.
Edit: just realized this is NYfirearms… so I would have to downgrade from a 19 round magazine to a 10 if I still lived in the Empire State😆.
 

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I have the 45acp Ronin and really like it but it takes a bit getting used to the 1911 platform. Its the first I've had in that type and took a while to get used to the safety. Maybe that's why people feel its not the right gun for newbies.
 

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I am a new owner so go easy on me. First purchase was a classic Ruger Security Six 4" in .357. I am researching my second purchase (for home defense) and after considering all the reviews I have a dilemma. First let me say I don't want a micro 9, or a small gun for CC. It's going to be for target and defense. I am a big dude and have large hands, so A full size is good for me. That said after tons of research I narrowed down to the Walther PDP, The Canik SFX9 and The Sig P226. All factors considered I believe the Canik is the best choice. Now the dilemma......I have always heard that 1911 style guns are not for newbies, and that they are less safe to handle. I am very interested in the Springfield Ronin in 9mm or 10mm. (My guess is that in lean ammo times 9mm is easier to get, so I'll probably go 9). After watching many videos is seems most polymers only have a split trigger and no safety (Glock) or 1 manual safety. The Ronin has a grip safety, thumb safety and if you don't rack the slide an extra safety on both if you count it that way. So why isn't the 1911 platform more safe? Any and all input appreciated.
I am a new owner so go easy on me. First purchase was a classic Ruger Security Six 4" in .357. I am researching my second purchase (for home defense) and after considering all the reviews I have a dilemma. First let me say I don't want a micro 9, or a small gun for CC. It's going to be for target and defense. I am a big dude and have large hands, so A full size is good for me. That said after tons of research I narrowed down to the Walther PDP, The Canik SFX9 and The Sig P226. All factors considered I believe the Canik is the best choice. Now the dilemma......I have always heard that 1911 style guns are not for newbies, and that they are less safe to handle. I am very interested in the Springfield Ronin in 9mm or 10mm. (My guess is that in lean ammo times 9mm is easier to get, so I'll probably go 9). After watching many videos is seems most polymers only have a split trigger and no safety (Glock) or 1 manual safety. The Ronin has a grip safety, thumb safety and if you don't rack the slide an extra safety on both if you count it that way. So why isn't the 1911 platform more safe? Any and all input appreciated.

I would suggest that you look for a Springfield Armory TRP Operator or if you can find a Range Officer Elite-both Model 1911s with adjustable rear sites and able to accomodate optical scopes or red dots if necessary. Accuracy is superb and for where you it should be sufficient until you need a something even more designed only for competition. Colts accuracy is not as good, especially after the Czech's bought the firm. the barrel on the SA is thicker and solid. Take your guns apart and keep them clean, so that you don't have problems-- My two cents.
 

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I am a new owner so go easy on me. First purchase was a classic Ruger Security Six 4" in .357. I am researching my second purchase (for home defense) and after considering all the reviews I have a dilemma. First let me say I don't want a micro 9, or a small gun for CC. It's going to be for target and defense. I am a big dude and have large hands, so A full size is good for me. That said after tons of research I narrowed down to the Walther PDP, The Canik SFX9 and The Sig P226. All factors considered I believe the Canik is the best choice. Now the dilemma......I have always heard that 1911 style guns are not for newbies, and that they are less safe to handle. I am very interested in the Springfield Ronin in 9mm or 10mm. (My guess is that in lean ammo times 9mm is easier to get, so I'll probably go 9). After watching many videos is seems most polymers only have a split trigger and no safety (Glock) or 1 manual safety. The Ronin has a grip safety, thumb safety and if you don't rack the slide an extra safety on both if you count it that way. So why isn't the 1911 platform more safe? Any and all input appreciated.
II would suggest that you look for a Springfield Armory TRP Operator or if you can find a Range Officer Elite-both Model 1911s with adjustable rear sites and able to accomodate optical scopes or red dots if necessary. Accuracy is superb and for where you it should be sufficient until you need a something even more designed only for competition. Colts accuracy is not as good, especially after the Czech's bought the firm. the barrel on the SA is thicker and solid. Take your guns apart and keep them clean, so that you don't have problems-- My two cents.
 

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I would suggest that you look for a Springfield Armory TRP Operator or if you can find a Range Officer Elite-both Model 1911s with adjustable rear sites and able to accomodate optical scopes or red dots if necessary. Accuracy is superb and for where you it should be sufficient until you need a something even more designed only for competition. Colts accuracy is not as good, especially after the Czech's bought the firm. the barrel on the SA is thicker and solid. Take your guns apart and keep them clean, so that you don't have problems-- My two cents.
How exactly do you say that Colt accuracy isn’t (as) good since the “Czechs” bought the company? CZ bought Colt about 6 months ago.😆
A company that has QC go up and down for decades has suddenly seen a huge decrease in production capability in about as much time as you need a new oil change for your car?
THAT’s just silly. Most of the reports I see are expecting things to get better at Colt.
CZ does know quite a bit about 1911s as they’ve owned Dan Wesson for more than a decade.
 

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Do you live near a range that has various rental options? Determining what works for you based on internet research is not really the best way. You need to fire DA/SA, SA, Striker guns. Also, if you are new to handguns - are there some ranges that have intro handgun courses - I don't mean to be offensive but focusing on equipment without a touch of training isn't optimal.

If one really wants a fighting semi - you can't beat a Glock 19, despite all the fretting and fussing about polymer and safeties. Training and practice is the cure for internet induced platform dread.
 

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1911 'cocked and locked' is as safe as it gets. The safety on a 1911 is one of the best....the detent is obvious and you will know when you click it on and off. Add to that the 'compression safety' in the grip and you have a double header of safety. As others have said, the ultimate safety is the one between your ears...used correctly it never fails. SA, S&W, Ruger and Kimber all make fine 1911 platforms...original Colts are collector items, but very serviceable if you want the real thing. A lot of water has gone down the crick since John Browning made the first 1911...it it still one of the best designs ever produced.
 

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Here's a discussion on 1911s -

Having shot Glocks and 1911s for years - I again reiterate that starting with equipment choices from abstract reading is fine but not sufficient. A new person needs a basic set of classes on gun handling and trying out different guns. With any gun - a regimen of dry firing is important. It is especially important with 1911s as your draw stroke needs to include an automatic release of the safety. It's been shown that under stress, even trained folks forget that. I've seen high end competitors with years under their belt, do that. It is especially likely, if you shoot from an unusual position. The motor memory for the draw, safety release usually takes place in a nice standing straight, there is the target mode. Getting away from that and folks draw and nothing happens as they forgot the safety.

So again, don't buy because it sounds cool or tactical - learn first. If you must have a gun for self-defense now - the standard recommendation for a new person is the revolver like you already have. Take some time to master a semi and forget for the moment cool sounding guns. Hope this helps and works out for you.
 
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