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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Anyone know of a shop Upstate that does Anodizing ??? I have 12 pre-ban AR mags I want done.....Then I think I will shoot them with Perma-Slik G.......Any thoughts ??? Thank you !
 

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My buddies turkey gun was done there and that things gets the crap beat out of it.. After 2 years I still looks brand new.

There pretty reasonable on pricing, just contact them and get a quote.

Im sending a pair of sunglasses to get dipped this week
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That sounds promising ! I wonder how thick the coating is ?? As in will it bind the followers do you think ??
 

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It's very thin. I wouldent worry much about the inside of the mags.

Look on YouTube how this stuff is done. It's a film that I suspended in water. It pretty crazy
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It's very thin. I wouldent worry much about the inside of the mags.
Thanks a bunch Brian,I appreciate the information,I owe ya one !
I will give them a shout tomorrow....
 

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the dip is to thick for most mags, it uses a primer then the dip. Unless they were to only dip what was visible and not what is up inside.

Also the mags would have to be steel for them to be parked. Most GI mags are not steel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
the dip is to thick for most mags, it uses a primer then the dip. Unless they were to only dip what was visible and not what is up inside.

Also the mags would have to be steel for them to be parked. Most GI mags are not steel.
I am open for suggestions bpipe....! These are Adventure Line mags....Pretty sure they are metal,not aluminum...
 

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All of my adventure lines are aluminum.

The problem with most (not all) tough spray on/bake on coatings is that you need to blast the item first, when you do this with an Aluminum mag you remove the tough anodizing. Then after they are sprayed the softer aluminum is exposed.

Leave them as is, you will get a long and problem free service life out of them.

But if you must coat them, have the exposed section of the mag dipped. leave the working end as is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
All of my adventure lines are aluminum.

The problem with most (not all) tough spray on/bake on coatings is that you need to blast the item first, when you do this with an Aluminum mag you remove the tough anodizing. Then after they are sprayed the softer aluminum is exposed.

Leave them as is, you will get a long and problem free service life out of them.

But if you must coat them, have the exposed section of the mag dipped. leave the working end as is.
Yes,I correct myself(long day)they are aluminum.......What about having them re-anodized ???
 

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A good cleaning with acetone or alcohol and a proper application of permaslik will do quite adiquately.
Or at least it has for the military for a few decades now.

Sunny day:
Dissasemble,
Clean. DON'T sand or use media blasting as you want to retain as much original anodizing as possible and the thickness of the permaslik will hide any anomolies like patchy anodizing.
Stand outside in sun, (sun helps cure, outdoors helps prevent the brain damage this stuff can create. Ii is a very powerful inhalent) spray thin but fully covering coat, (tip: instead of fully dissassembling use protruding spring as a handle to hold and hang the mag body. The overspray won't hurt the spring a bit either)
Hang in sun, wait 15 minutes for first coat to flash, spray 2nd coat,
Cure overnight indoors,.
Reassemble.
Wear gloves as there will be residue coming off onto your hands
Resist urge to polish them out unless you really like the bright shiny silver look. They'll wear on thier own over time, no need to accelerate the process.

Side note: baking permaslik does nothing for increasing the longevity or hardness of the coating.
It does make the epoxy cure faster, which IMO isn't what you want to happen if you wish to have as much coating as possible stick as densly as possible.
You can literally see the difference in finish from baked to not, along with a difference in how much residue comes off when done. Baked end up looking like they have a shiny plastic shell once the excess wears off while time cured retain much of the flat primer look that mags have when NIB.

Well, that and baking makes the oven and house smell like a meth lab for several hours.

Hint, more residue comes off when baked because the epoxy didn't have a chance to stick down as much moly before it was force cured.

This is based on personal experience and discussing it with a supplier.
(who ironically enough asked me right off if I was refinishing mags LOL)
Thier thought process was that baking did nothing to improve the final finish, it just got it done quicker.

There's an old thread around here somewhere that show's a pile of mine after processing as described above.

EDIT:
Link to thread.
Includes pictures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
That sounds easy enough......I saw those pictures of the ones you did in that thread link you sent me.......Is that Perma-Slik silver/gray colored ?? It looks like it is because your mags are a different worn color before you painted them,and back to gray after.....Thanks for the info,I really appreciate it !
 

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Color can vary a bit by batch and age (the stuff has a low shelf life and 'dispose of' date) but its not as silvery as the pix may suggest.
Prior to any handling/buffing/wiping they are much, much closer to a medium or medium dark very flat primer gray.
A very close match to what a production NIB would look like given they use that or simular chemical makeup coatings on mags during production.
More a case of who mixed it when rather than X brand color vs Y brand color.

No silver at all unless buffed which is a function of the moly regardless of carrier medium or application method.
Its simply a bit silvery when burnished or buffed no matter what its put on, even your fingers.

Note that the worn ones were just that: worn.
Years of scuffing, beating around, going in and out of mag pouches in all sorts of enviornments + whatever oil and other chemicals have saturated into the coating and metal itself over that time.
New aluminum is bright, (almost white actually but begins oxidation immediately) old aluminum, nor so much.
This leaves ever darkening metal showing through ever thinning, if not outright stripped off, outer coatings.

Wish you could see one in person as the camera doesn't do them justice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
So The Perma-Slik is colored then ??
 

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Why not do it yourself.

All you need is battery acid from auto parts store, distilled water from grocery store, some aluminum wire to use as cathode, a power supply (like battery charger), dye in color of your choice from arts and crafts store, and drain cleaner to neutralize the acid when you're done. The hardest part is prepping the surface.

All in all, it's a nice weekend DIY project.

Use gloves, eye protection, and do it outside. And always add acid to water, not the other way :)
 

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Get a can of krylon and paint your mags. When it scrapes off, paint them again.

$2 and done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I spoke to a rep at Neely Industries today,the distributor of Perma-Slik G......After getting some great technical advice on prep and application(they have excellent customer service btw !) I ordered two cans,and am going to use a buddys sand blasting machine to prep the surfaces then coat the mags.....I will post some pic's when I am done,might be a week or two.....Wish me luck....HaHa....!
 

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You going bake or air dry?

And yes, it does have a color to it.
It'll pretty much look like automotive primer when applying it. (moly is a grayish black color in general which plays a part in the final color)
 
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