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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I read thread after thread of how guys hate the turn rings on revolvers, heck to me if I see a revolver with a prominent turn ring to me that's a guy/girl that knows how to shoot that gun and I bet you very well.to me its a badge of honor that I shoot and know my revolver well ...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have read some threads on how you can adjust the timing to not get the ring and some do.
 

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Just means it gets a lot of use. Wouldn't mind seeing them.
 

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Technically speaking, in a 100% perfectly timed and perfectly fitted revolver with perfectly machined parts in a perfect world, by design, a revolver should not get bolt drag marks. Realistically speaking though, this generally isn't going to happen in a production gun (though it's true work can be done to improve the timing and create less of a drag mark).

James mentions machining a groove to prevent it. Now again, purely technically speaking, there is already one as part of the design; in that the bolt drop groove before the locking notch is intended to serve that purpose. Back in the really real world however, that suggestion does make sense.. though with one caveat. Cutting a complete groove would mean also lessening the other side of the locking notch's overall flat contact edge. So, as the revolver wore it might mean eventually getting less of a positive lock (or losing it completely) against that surface as it's edges wore around the groove from contact with the cylinder stop as it drew away from the notch .

Does that make sense ? heh

On the OTHER hand though, it's possible you'd lose less material from 'cutting' the cylinder stop with the flat hard edge (thereby keeping better timing and creating less of a gritty edge which causes the drag lines). I can see both possibilities from the technical standpoint, but I have to assume the experienced gun makers know what's best.
 

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Technically speaking, in a 100% perfectly timed and perfectly fitted revolver with perfectly machined parts in a perfect world, by design, a revolver should not get bolt drag marks. Realistically speaking though, this generally isn't going to happen in a production gun (though it's true work can be done to improve the timing and create less of a drag mark).

James mentions machining a groove to prevent it. Now again, purely technically speaking, there is already one as part of the design; in that the bolt drop groove before the locking notch is intended to serve that purpose. Back in the really real world however, that suggestion does make sense.. though with one caveat. Cutting a complete groove would mean also lessening the other side of the locking notch's overall flat contact edge. So, as the revolver wore it might mean eventually getting less of a positive lock (or losing it completely) against that surface as it's edges wore around the groove from contact with the cylinder stop as it drew away from the notch .

Does that make sense ? heh

On the OTHER hand though, it's possible you'd lose less material from 'cutting' the cylinder stop with the flat hard edge (thereby keeping better timing and creating less of a gritty edge which causes the drag lines). I can see both possibilities from the technical standpoint, but I have to assume the experienced gun makers know what's best.
I would leave enough material so it would still lock up without issues. The ring usually gets worn in by opening and closing the cylinder and it not mating to the cylinder latch when closing it.

James
 

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That's a good point, and I hadn't really considered it. Carefully indexing the cylinder before closing it would certainly reduce the drag marks. I was thinking purely in terms of the mechanics as designed and not so much in human "error", if that can really be called error anyway. Still though, I think if there were a groove you'd have to make it as large on the other side as the drop groove already is.. sort of. Even if it weren't though, I did say 'might' in regards to eventual wear, because I think the current production MIM stops/bolts (on S&W's for example) would wear much quicker than the hardened steel of the cylinder anyway.

Maybe we should design a better revolver together James ..hehe
 

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Unless it is a safe queen, and even non-fired safe queens will develop a turn line if the cylinder is rotated, a turn line is honest wear and is part of the history of a revolver. My revolvers range from about 1916 to 1975 and I wish they all could talk to tell me how they got their wear.
 
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