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I live in Suffolk County on Long Island and this year will be 39 years that I’ve had a “sportsman” pistol permit. My question is for all of you upstate. How easy is it to get a full carry permit upstate ? Here on Long Island it’s only given if you can prove you carry a lot of money for a business , you can prove your life is in danger , retired LEO. Does this apply upstate ? I always thought this was a statewide law , is it or is it up to the county. Many times I thought about applying for a full carry permit but then I read the SCPD license handbook and forget about it for a couple of years.
 

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Not only is not statewide, it isn't even a law. Those are administrative restrictions and you can't face charges for disobeying them. You just face revocation is the Judge finds out.

To answer your question, it depends on county. In places like Erie and Monroe, almost all permits are "full carry." In others like Albany, there is a good chance you are getting restrictions. It's very arbitrary in that way.
 

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I would tread lightly with the whole "restrictions aren't law" responses. While it is true that you can't get charged with unlawful possession, you could be charged with the catch-all provision in section 15 of the penal law (400) which says any violation of your license is a misdemeanor. Even if the only thing that happens is you get your permit yanked, you will have ALL guns seized. Depending on your collection this could be the equivalent to a $1,000, $10,000, $25,000 fine etc. Plus as an added bonus you forfeit your 2A rights! Cool huh? But at least you didn't get charged because restrictions aren't law! You showed that judge whose boss! You can now see how that is terrible advice. Ignore it.

On to your actual question now. The licensing law is state law. State law says you may be issued a carry concealed permit when proper cause is shown. Some counties only require a brief explanation while others will make it a bit more difficult, meaning you need to put more work into formulating it. But the law is clear - if you can in fact establish it, you can get the concealed carry license (the real one). That's the law. Not trying is only hurting yourself. That's what they want. To discourage you from even trying. Get busy. Research what worked for others in your county. Get creative. Pay a lawyer to write up a proper cause statement on letterhead. It'll show the judge that you're serious and that if he denies you that a legal fight is likely coming his way. (Let him think it even if it's not true). Good luck and get going.
 

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County specific

I live in Suffolk County on Long Island and this year will be 39 years that I've had a "sportsman" pistol permit. My question is for all of you upstate. How easy is it to get a full carry permit upstate ? Here on Long Island it's only given if you can prove you carry a lot of money for a business , you can prove your life is in danger , retired LEO. Does this apply upstate ? I always thought this was a statewide law , is it or is it up to the county. Many times I thought about applying for a full carry permit but then I read the SCPD license handbook and forget about it for a couple of years.
It depends on the County in which you apply for full carry. Having grown up in Queens and then moved upstate, I understand your dilemma.
A lot will depend on your references. For references, I chose people well known and respected in my upstate county. I noted my reason for full carry as my work as a computer consultant often transporting expensive equipment. It was enough to convince a County judge and I was granted full carry. Good luck to you.
 

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Agreed varies by county. Around me in Cortland, Cayuga and Tioga county's, conceal carry no problem with little articulation. In liberal Tompkins County, forget about it.
 

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"can prove you carry a lot of money for a business , you can prove your life is in danger , retired LEO. Does this apply upstate ? "
Just the opposite actually. They don't take kindly you shooting someone for stealing your money. The window for self defense is very small and it better be in defense of your life and not your money.
They look more at your firearms experience than those excuses. Gun club membership, legnth of time you have had your permit, what safety classes you have taken. Most instructors will advise if you carry to get range time in at least once a month and take at least one NRA or USCCA course per year.
 

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I would tread lightly with the whole "restrictions aren't law" responses. While it is true that you can't get charged with unlawful possession, you could be charged with the catch-all provision in section 15 of the penal law (400) which says any violation of your license is a misdemeanor. Even if the only thing that happens is you get your permit yanked, you will have ALL guns seized. Depending on your collection this could be the equivalent to a $1,000, $10,000, $25,000 fine etc. Plus as an added bonus you forfeit your 2A rights! Cool huh? But at least you didn't get charged because restrictions aren't law! You showed that judge whose boss! You can now see how that is terrible advice. Ignore it.

On to your actual question now. The licensing law is state law. State law says you may be issued a carry concealed permit when proper cause is shown. Some counties only require a brief explanation while others will make it a bit more difficult, meaning you need to put more work into formulating it. But the law is clear - if you can in fact establish it, you can get the concealed carry license (the real one). That's the law. Not trying is only hurting yourself. That's what they want. To discourage you from even trying. Get busy. Research what worked for others in your county. Get creative. Pay a lawyer to write up a proper cause statement on letterhead. It'll show the judge that you're serious and that if he denies you that a legal fight is likely coming his way. (Let him think it even if it's not true). Good luck and get going.
§ 400.00(15): "Any violation by any person of any provision of this section is a class A misdemeanor."

So...no?
 
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