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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Are preban magazine widely available for these? Are these pistols any good? Does anyne know why they are called high power when it's just a 9mm?

I have been looking more into pistols since I got my permit in the works and I want to make a good educated purchase for my first one, I just need something cheap that I can beat up while I learn the fundamentals of shooting these little things, they are much different then a rifle. I have seen Browning high powers alot but never heard much about them, what are the forum members thoughts?
 

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High cap mags are available. There were South African prebans at the last Syracuse show, brand new still packaged with a loader in each bag for $29 each. I know a shooter who is shooting one in 3 gun and ipsc.
 

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The gun has been around since 1935, so "pre ban" mags should be available. The term "High-Power" has more to do with when the gun was being developed rather than the round it uses. The gun has been over shadowed by newer designs like the Glock 17, SIG P226 and a few others.

If you want a cheap beater gun, buy a Glock. If you want a classic handgun, a BHP is it.
 

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It's "high power" compared to .25ACP and .32ACP guns that were popular when it was designed.

BHP is a good gun, but if Dieudonné Saive did not change striker-fired Browning prototype to use 1911-style hammer it would have been even better. Like Glock, only half a century earlier. Linkage in the slide connecting trigger in the frame and hammer in the frame is a giveaway, as it clearly lacks the elegance of other Browning's designs.
 

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The Hi-Power is the 9mm equivalent of the 1911 - a classic design, albeit arguably somewhat outdated, but one of the all-time best. I don't think you can go wrong with one as a first pistol; kinda like learning to drive in a good, reliable old stick-shift car.
 

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i am only familiar with the older hi-powers which have gotten pretty pricey these days. for me the the hi-power was the auto that i was able to shoot with the best accuracy consistently. to me the gun has a great natural pointability. i put a set of slimmer browning aftermarket plastic grips on and for a double stack gun it is pretty thin. due to their long production run there should be good parts availability out there not that there were ever many problems with the gun. as i said i don't know the quality of the post belguim guns. using quality ammo and factory mags i never had a problem with FTF or FTE. the old hi-powers are class guns and i think will always be held in that light.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanx for all the information, I learned they were quite old watching a Hikok45 review on them.

I want the a model with the "AK47" type rear sight, I think they look quite nice, hopefully my permit comes through soon so I can start actually looking for one.



One like this looks pretty nice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
One thing hi-powers usually arent are CHEAP.

I have 2, they are both GREAT shooters, One of them is my EDC gun.

Plenty of pre-bans out there.
I have seen tons and tons on gunbroker going for 400-500 a piece for decent used ones, all I need is an FFL that'll take online auctions and I could have 1 just add the transfer fee on. I did notice the really really pristine ones going in upwards of 1200 dollars though, I don't wanna spend that kinda cash lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I'm curious how you arrived at a BHP as a first gun to learn on. If pre-bans are important to you, I would recommend a Glock or Sig P226/P229.
Well I have seen them for very good prices online, they have more then stood the test of time, they have prebans available and they might be nice to fix up and try to do things like re-blue, make some custom grips, things like that.

I'm kind of treating it as the "Mosin Nagant" of semi automatic pistols, they also fire a common caliber and I like the look of them, they are pretty thin for a double stack pistol.

Plus if I ever decide to carry it while hunting or something I won't be worried about putting holster wear on a 70 year old gun.
 

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I have a Nickel Belgium BHP with adjustable sights. Classic handgun used by many elite military and LE units around the world. The British SAS and FBI HRT did use them. If you are looking for a good hi cap 9mm I would go with a P228 or Glock 19 since you can find preban mags. I would recommend a Hi-power.
 

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Pre-ban HP mags are generally cheaper than Glock pre-bans due to popularity and maybe number made. The $450-$500 Hi-powers are usually ex -israeli police and many times are beat up.
 

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Buy one and don't ever look back. Mine like the 1911's will still be here when I'm gone.
 

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I have a hi-power and have shot it a LOT. I have been using it in USPSA and 3gun since last spring. I have thousands of rounds through it.

Preban mags are available. 13 rd OEM mags are expensive. $40+. There are no markings and no way to identify a true preban. I have a whole bunch of 17 round KRD steel preban mags. They work pretty well but are not quite as reliable as OEM mags. There are also preban 13 round mec-gar mags which work as well as OEM.

It's called the hi-power because it's double stack and holds 13 rounds in a flush magazine. The design was started by John Moses Browning but it's NOT the same design as the 1911. The locking lugs are the same and the slide stop lever holds the barrel link. The magazine release is besically the same too. Thats pretty much where the similarities end.

The hipower does not use a trigger bar like the 1911. When you pull the trigger there is a small pin that protrudes up in the area of the rear of the trigger. That pin pushes up on the transfer bar located in the slide. The transfer bar pivots in the middle so when you push up on the front, the back goes down and pushes down on the sear which in turn releases the hammer. What this means is that when you pull the trigger it's heavy. You're fighting the trigger spring, the transfer bar return spring and the mainspring (plus the mag disconnect if you have one). I installed a C&S lightening kit and I still have about a 6lb trigger. The trigger reset is about a mile long and there isn't anything you can do about it without a lot of work by a good gunsmith.

If you want a cool gun with history, go for it. If you want a good shooting gun avoid it like the plague. The trigger is too heavy for accurate shooting IMO and the pre-travel and reset are way too long to be a good gun for going fast.

Overall, now that I have shot mine a lot, it's a crap design and I am replacing it for USPSA/3gun shooting with something else that has a better trigger.

Save yourself a headache and buy a 1911 or 2011.
 
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