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Enfields and AKs, I'm proud to own both, they keep on ticking long after they should have quit.
 

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And Mosin Nagants. I'm not sure how you would ever break a Mosin; there's like 4 moving parts!
O yes, I forgot, they weren't mentioned in the article so they slipped my mind but I have 2 Mosins, I think you can break them in about the same way you break a 2x4, with an axe and a chainsaw, other then that I'm willing to bet you could probably shatter the barrel into a few pieces and it would still shoot pretty good lol
 

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I gotta ask:
2nd to last paragraph, 2/3~ish through, talking about age and type weapons in use
'has helped a largely illiterate insurgency...'

What, pray tell, does literacy have to do with availability and creativity level of maintenance teamed with a cause they very strongly believe in have to do with it?

Kinda strikes me more as a 'lookie here at the cavemen using pointy sticks' dig than a neccisary or even worthy addition to the article.

I've known personally several illiterates who could crush a Harvard grad with thier level of actual skill and intelligence.
There's even been one or two over the course of history that didn't let the lack of reading ability stop them from domination on the battlefield, industry, finance, or even creating/contolling an empirical monarchy.

No relevance I guess is what I'm getting at.
Sort of like tagging on a 'and Mr. So~n~so, who is (insert race/ethnicity/religion), lives down the street from where the event took place, had no comment'

AFA the weapons in general, if the tools work you use them, if they don't work you repair them, if they are unrepairable you replace them.
While what they had as old, it likely wasn't worn out nearly as much as the author would try to impress.

Like the 1950's era AK.
He's talking like only primitives would use such and old thing, but I'd bet dollars to doughnuts that it was taken from, or left by, a Russian regular army trooper who had it issued to him in the 80's.

Hell, there were still slabside XM/16s and ancient Korea era 90mm recoiless rifles in our arms room into the early 90's, and we were an active duty army combat arms front line unit.
There's likely still some in guard and reserve units.
Look up the currently still in active air force unit use GUA GAO or whatever they call the current incarnations of thier rifles. Almost as old as that AK and put in the hands of guards and military police types to this very day

They are there because they still work or are servicable, even though the very vast majority of personnel can read.

If that's the equiptment you have available then thats the equiptment you use.
Its not like our soldiers wouldn't fight if they were handed pencil barrel CARs with drop in auto sears and had to rely on physical eye~on searching instead of an M4 an access to a drone *shrug*

Side note: author completely missed an even more glaring point.
Those weapons, old and new, are physical remains and constant reminders of other nations failure at attempted domination or subjegation in the past of those peoples.
 

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I gotta ask:
2nd to last paragraph, 2/3~ish through, talking about age and type weapons in use
'has helped a largely illiterate insurgency...'

What, pray tell, does literacy have to do with availability and creativity level of maintenance teamed with a cause they very strongly believe in have to do with it?

Kinda strikes me more as a 'lookie here at the cavemen using pointy sticks' dig than a neccisary or even worthy addition to the article.

I've known personally several illiterates who could crush a Harvard grad with thier level of actual skill and intelligence.
There's even been one or two over the course of history that didn't let the lack of reading ability stop them from domination on the battlefield, industry, finance, or even creating/contolling an empirical monarchy.

No relevance I guess is what I'm getting at.
Sort of like tagging on a 'and Mr. So~n~so, who is (insert race/ethnicity/religion), lives down the street from where the event took place, had no comment'

AFA the weapons in general, if the tools work you use them, if they don't work you repair them, if they are unrepairable you replace them.
While what they had as old, it likely wasn't worn out nearly as much as the author would try to impress.
Like the 1950's era AK.
He's talking like only primitives would use such and old thing, but I'd bet dollars to doughnuts that it was taken from, or left by, a Russian regular army trooper who had it issued to him in the 80's.

Hell, there were still slabside XM/16s and ancient Korea era 90mm recoiless rifles in our arms room into the early 90's, and we were an active duty army combat arms front line unit.
There's likely still some in guard and reserve units.
Look up the currently still in active air force unit use GUA type rifles. Almost as old as that AK and put in the hands of guards and military police types.

They are there because they still work or are servicable, even though the very vast majority of personnel can read.

If that's the equiptment you have available. Its not like our soldiers wouldn't fight if they were handed pencil barrel CARs with drop in auto sears instead of an M4 *shrug*

Side note: author completely missed an even more glaring point.
Those weapons, old and new, are physical remains and constant reminders of other nations failure at attempted domination or subjegation in the past of those peoples.
I took that to mean that they have no manuals, no instructors, no school, no instructions, and yet here they are facing a military with all of those things, (and more considering our military is one of the best funded and trained in the world) and yet they are formidable and resourceful opponents.
 

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As a whole that may have been the intent though the talk of recent inventories and whatnot led me to believe the info was being used to help determine if thier supplies were drying up rather than the need for ancient equiptment because the backward folk couldn't grasp the concept of modern stuff.

Then again, the meds make me perceive things a little differently than everyone else.
Not neccisarily right or wrong, just differently.
People try to think outside the box, I think from within a bottle ;)
 
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