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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I started refinishing my fathers old hand me down .22 Its a savage / springfield bolt action...

Unfortunately i did not take any before hand photos so you cant see how dirty / rusty it was.

But here is the refinished stock... and I used Electrolysis to remove the majority of the rust from the parts. Then hit it with oil a 0000 steel wool..

The metal of the barrel is severely pitted... and the bolt handle / trigger had a fake chrome paint that has chipped off most of it...

Should i even bother reblueing the barrel with all the pits?

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
couple of an old 16g i cleaned up. I dont think im going to refinish the stock. But I may reblue the barrel.

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If you don't clean out the pits they will rust. Birchwood Casey Blue and Rust remover might work for that. Glass beading works very well for cleaning out the pits. Some gloss or flat black paint is much easier and easily touched up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
so in other words. just paint it lol :)

Gun is as clean as it could ever get right now. Spent about 3 hours going over it with steel wool and oil

Gunkote is way more work than the gun is worth
 

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Should i even bother reblueing the barrel with all the pits?
Those aren't pits, they're character! I'd leave it as is and just keep it oiled.

Or maybe try a little cold blue under the stock to see how it might look. But I don't think that gun was meant to be painted.
 

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It may not have been meant to be painted but that is the least expensive way to protect a gun with little more than sentimental value. My dad hunted for years with an '03-A3 Springfield that was painted black while saving up for the bluing tank set up. Worked fine, was durable and cost about a buck and a half at the time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I can just keep it rubbed down with motor oil / chainsaw lube oil,basically any lubeish oilish substance that wont stain it.. And I am speaking stictly the outer barrel..
 

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Those aren't pits, they're character! I'd leave it as is and just keep it oiled.

Or maybe try a little cold blue under the stock to see how it might look. But I don't think that gun was meant to be painted.
I second that,
I see a wood and steel classic. I would just keep it cleaned and well oiled. I would try using Birchwood Casey Barricade on it.
 

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I third that (or fourth, not sure). If it shoots as straight as it looks (looks like a nice shooter to me) leave it be. It has a lot of character.
 

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I used some product that I bought at woodcraft.com on some old iron planes that worked great but permanently "dulled" the metal. I don't think it will fix the pitting but will definitely remove the rust. I can check my garage if I still have the bottle for brand if you're interested. Let me know.
 

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I think a nice patina for an older .22 rifle does add character.

Unless you keep the rifle in a safe or locker any amount of oil tends to attract and hold dirt. Over time the accumulated dirt can gunk up those pits unless you stay on top of it.

Whatever you decide good luck with your sentimental project and keep us posted, preferably with pictures.
 

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A late comment but oh well . . .

If you're not going to make some efforts to repair the pits then it probably isn't worth the effort of rebluing it -- since it is not going to look very good with a new coat of bluing over a rough surface. (Just so this is clear, repairing those pits would be a lot of sanding and polishing work, and then it would be a bunch of additional work to keep the lettering intact.)

So if you're not going to go that route, then I'd suggest a utilitarian coating to prevent further oxidation, and preferably one that is a little "thick" so that it hides the pitting some. Duracoat or Gunkote come to mind. Duracoat needs a long time to cure before it is very tough, although you can speed up the cure if you put it in a warmer place (like an attic during the summer). Whatever coating you use, I would start off by giving it a good round of bead blasting so that your finish has a good surface to grip. This will also cut the visible pitting.

A middle option would be to bead blast, polish some, and then blue. A decent number of WWII guns were finished this way. That way you would still be rubbing oil all over the metal parts of the gun to prevent oxidation. (With a paint-type coating this serves little purpose -- just use a synthetic to lubricate the moving parts.)

Whatever you do, do not use "cold blue." This is nothing but a metal coloring chemical treatment that does nothing -- nothing -- to protect against further corrosion. It is not "bluing" and it should not be marketed under that term. The only purpose the stuff serves is to help unscrupulous sellers cover up blemishes on guns being sold to unsuspecting third parties. The "cold blued" blemishes will rust rapidly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
well to update...

I ended up just cleaning it more and steel wooling... same for the 16g


the .22lr has a feeding malfunction im fairly sure its the mag so i handed it back over to my father for it to sit another 20 years till i inherit it... again

and the 16g resides in my safe with a box o birdshot JIC
 
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